1 2 p 236 The 1871 German article translated by Jensen reproduces the table

1 2 p 236 the 1871 german article translated by

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2. [p. 236] The 1871 German article translated by Jensen reproduces the table given in the Russian original of November 1870, illustrated by Gordin (2004, p. 35). 3. [p. 237] Argon dos not strictly fall into the gap as its atomic weight is greater than that of potassium. Mendeleev got round this by assuming a mass of 38. 4. [p. 238] The titles published for the centenary of 1869 referred to the Periodic System (Spronsen, 1969; Mazurs, 1974). Those appearing in this century have referred to the Periodic Table (Rouvray and King, 2004; Scerri, 2007). 5. [p. 239; amended] For Mendeleev, two ‘rows’ ( ryad , German ‘ Reihe ,’) or ‘series’ ( seria ), made one ‘period’. This worked anomalously as Li to F were neither. The first period ran from Na to Ni or Cu, the second from Zn or Cu to Pd or Ag, and the third and fourth were full of gaps where the lanthanides should have been. Incidentally, his predictions of eka- and dvi- elements in the lanthanide range were not really separate mistakes, but one mistake several times repeated. 6. [p. 239] Janet ‘corrected’ the ‘wrong’ orbitals to make them fit (Janet, 1930, p. 21). 7. [p. 241] It is also possible to envisage negative atomic numbers for the elements of anti-matter. 8. [p. 241] Von Antropoff’s table is widely known as that of Linus Pauling, who used it – minus element zero - in his 1949 book, General Chemistry . 9. [p. 241] Van Spronsen (1969 pp. 160, 167, 172, 183). In re-drawing Janet’s spiral, he placed the central zero above hydrogen instead of helium. REFERENCES P.W. Atkins and H Kaesz. A central position for hydrogen in the periodic table. Chem. Internat. 25, p.14, 2003. J.D. Clark. A Modern Periodic Chart of the Chemical Elements. Science 111, pp. 661-63, 1950. E. Crawford.     The beginnings of the Nobel Institution: the science prizes 1901-1915 . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 1984 M.W. Cronyn. The Proper Place of Hydrogen in the Periodic Table. J. Chem. Education 80, pp. 947-951, 2003. W Crookes.   Presidential address to the Royal Society, Chemical Section.    Chemical News   45, pp. 115-126, 1886. 1
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E.I. Emerson. A New Spiral Form of the Periodic Table.  J. Chem. Education  22, pp. 111- 115, 1944. J. Emsley. Mendeleev’s Dream Table. New Scientist 105, pp. 32-36, 1985. R. M. Friedman,  The politics of excellence: behind the Nobel Prize in science . New York: W. H. Freeman.  2001. M. D. Gordin.   A well-ordered thing: Dmitri Mendeleev and the shadow of the periodic table.   New York: Basic Books.  2004. F. Habashi. A new look at the periodic table. Interdisciplinary Science Reviews, 22, 53- 60, 1997. C. Janet. La structure du noyau de l’atome, considérée dans la classification périodique des Eléments Chimiques . Beauvais: Imprimerie Départementale de l’Oise. 1927. C. Janet. La classification hélicoïdale des éléments chimiques . Beauvais: Imprimerie Départementale de l’Oise. 1928. C. Janet. The helicoidal classification of the elements. Chemical News 138, pp. 372-374; 388-393, 1929. C. Janet.    Concordance de l’arrangement quantique de base des  é lectrons plan é taires des  atomes avec la  classification   scalariforme,  h é lico ï dale  des elements  chimiques.
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