Merely ethical behavior behavior that adheres to some minimally accepted

Merely ethical behavior behavior that adheres to some

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Merely ethical behavior: behavior that adheres to some minimally accepted standard of morality Ex. obeying labor laws and complying with formal rules and contracts Especially ethical behavior: behaviors that exceed some minimally accepted standard of morality Ex. charitable giving, whistle-blowing - when former or current employees expose illegal or immoral actions by their organization Four-component model - model that argues that ethical behaviors result from the multistage sequence of moral awareness, moral judgment, moral intent, and ethical behavior Unethical behavior can be triggered by characteristics of a person or the situation: one bad apple can spoil the barrel Moral awareness - when an authority recognizes that a moral issue exists in a situation or that an ethical code or principle is relevant to the circumstance Sometimes authorities act unethically simply because they don’t perceive that moral issues are relevant in a given situation, so the ethical merits of certain actions are never debated; ethical issues rarely equipped with red flags Moral intensity - degree to which an issue has ethical urgency; driven by 2 concerns: Issue is high in moral intensity if the potential for harm is perceived to be high Act that could injure 1000 people is more morally intense than an act that could injure 10 people; act that could result in death more morally intense than act that could result in illness Issue is high in moral intensity if there’s social pressure surrounding it Act that violates a clear social norm is more morally intense than an act
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that seems similar to what everyone else is doing Moral awareness depends in part on characteristics of the issue itself, as some issues have more built-in ethical salience than others as well as on the way authorities observe and perceive the events that happen around them Moral attentiveness - captures the degree to which people chronically perceive and consider issues of morality during their experiences People pay more attention to stimuli that are significant, vivid, and recognizable Authorities who are morally attentive tend to view the world through a lens of morality, giving ethical issues a particular significance, vividness, and recognizability. That lens colors the way they identify and interpret info and also shapes the way they analyze and reflect on it Morally attentive people are likely to report that they face several ethical dilemmas in a typical day, that many of the decisions they face have ethical consequences, that they regularly think about issues of morality. And that they enjoy pondering moral issues Moral judgment - when an authority can accurately identify the “right” course of action; reflects the process people use to determine whether a particular course of action is ethical or not Cognitive moral development - theory that argues that as people age and mature, they
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