cohesion n the act of holding together The cohesion of the group increased as

Cohesion n the act of holding together the cohesion

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cohesion (n.) the act of holding together The cohesion of the group increased as friendships were formed. The cohesion of different molecules forms different substances. cohort (n.) a group; band
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The cohort of teens gathered at the athletic field. collaborate (v.) to work together; cooperate The two builders collaborated to get the house finished. colloquial (adj.) having to do with conversation; informal speech The colloquial reference indicated the free spirit of the group. When you listen to the difference between spoken colloquial conversation and written work, you realize how good an ear a novelist must have to write authentic dialogue. collusion (n.) secret agreement for an illegal purpose The authority discovered a collusion between the director and treasurer. comeliness (n.) beauty; attractiveness in appearance or behavior The comeliness of the woman attracted everyone s attention. commiserate (v.) to show sympathy for The hurricane victims commiserated about the loss of their homes. commodious (adj.) spacious and convenient; roomy The new home was so commodious that many new pieces of furniture needed to be purchased. communal (adj.) shared or common ownership The communal nature of the project made everyone pitch in to help. compatible (adj.) in agreement with; harmonious When repairing an automobile, it is necessary to use parts compatible with that make and model. complacent (adj.) content; self - satisfied; smug The CEO worries regularly that his firm s winning ways will make it complacent. The candidate was so complacent with his poll numbers that he virtually stopped campaigning. complaisance (n.) the quality of being agreeable or eager to please The complaisance of the new assistant made it easy for the managers to give him a lot of work without worrying that he may complain. compliant (adj.) complying; obeying; yielding Compliant actions should be reinforced.
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The slave was compliant with every order to avoid being whipped. comport (v.) fitting in It was easy to comport to the new group of employees. comprehensive (adj.) all - inclusive; complete; thorough It s the only health facility around to offer comprehensive care. compromise (v.) to settle by mutual adjustment Labor leaders and the automakers compromised by agreeing to a starting wage of $16 an hour in exchange for concessions on health - care premiums. concede (v.) to acknowledge; admit; to surrender; to abandon one s position After much wrangling, the conceded that the minister had a point. Satisfied with the recount, the mayor conceded graciously. conceit (n.) an exaggerated personal opinion The man s belief that he was the best player on the team was pure conceit. conciliation (n.) an attempt to make friendly or placate The attempt at conciliation conciliatory (adj.) to reconcile The diplomat sought to take a conciliatory approach to keep the talks going.
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  • Spring '14
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  • n., adj.

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