with the program you are applying to Let them know they will become part of a

With the program you are applying to let them know

This preview shows page 19 - 21 out of 24 pages.

with the program you are applying to. Let them know they will become part of a greater narrative by accepting you. You have generated momentum -- and this school can keep you going!In this way, your awards can be an exciting and meaningful part of your application, not an example of arrogance.If you have contributed back to the organizations that have given you awards, try to mention your efforts. It is proof of your caring, understanding of your privilege, gratefulness and dedication.Without saying so explicitly, let the school know that, by accepting you, they are helping put you in an even better position to give back...and hint that you won't forget to give back to them someday, either! (Examples are volunteering, producing more fine work in the program's name, speaking on their behalf, or just by being a good "face" for the program.)This speaks to your ability to take advantage of your opportunities, learn, work hard, improve, and, overall, to be honorable. Which is why you got the awards in the first place, right?   Not only can this help you get accepted, it can also put you in a better financial aid situation. It says you are a worthwhile investment.It is always good to show that other people have believed in you, entrusted you with opportunities, and that you consider it your responsibility to continue to do them proud! You consider this program  to be the next step that, in turn, helps you pay back all the previous steps.Then the school knows you aspire to excellence on behalf of people who invest in you.Who wouldn't want to be part of that?       could they even begin to divine what all that mumbo-jumbo means? I take that to mean you're in no better or worse shape than anyone else. If you feel that you got passed over, it's more than likely NOT because you left out the names of your classes. I'm under the impression (and several professors have confirmed this) that the classes you took are less interesting to them than a sense of whether you "speak the language" and how you got to that point. When you write about your project, do you convey that sense of "I know what I'm doing and I don't have to mention a bunch of names to prove it"? Is your interest in the topic personal enough that you'll stick it out? Why do you want to study this? Why are we the school to do it at? Who here is going to help you and how are you going to help them?
Image of page 19
Image of page 20
Image of page 21

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 24 pages?

  • Spring '14
  • 2
  • Admissions Committee

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture