However usb 30 peripherals that use this port are

Info icon This preview shows pages 6–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
However, USB 3.0 peripherals that use this port are able to accept older USB Type-B connectors.
Image of page 6

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Micro-B The USB 3.0 Micro-B connector is used by portable devices, such as compact external storage devices, digital cameras, or smartphones. USB devices are connected to computers in one of two ways: Directly to a USB port located on the motherboard or on the front panel of a case To an external USB hub that is connected to the computer USB hubs can be chained together to provide even more USB ports. USB devices can be classified according to how they receive power. Type Description Self- powered Devices that rely on their own power supply (i.e., they are plugged into an AC outlet) are self-powered devices (sometimes called active devices). USB 2.0 devices that draw more than 500 mA of power are required to be self- powered; USB 3.0 devices that draw more than 900 mA of power are required to be self-powered. Bus- powered USB cables have wires to carry both power and data. Bus-powered (sometimes called passive ) devices get their power via the USB cable. Bus-powered devices are classified as low-powered or high-powered devices, depending on the amount of power they draw from the USB bus. Low powered devices use 100 mA or less High-powered devices use between 100 and 500 mA (up to 900 mA for USB 3.0) Like USB devices, USB hubs can be bus-powered or self-powered. You cannot connect high-powered devices to a bus- powered hub (you can only connect low-powered or self-powered devices to a bus-powered hub). Therefore, self- powered hubs that provide 500 mA per port are recommended to ensure an adequate power supply to all bus-powered devices that you may wish to connect to the hub. To install a USB device, you typically install the software driver before attaching the device. When you plug in the device, it will be automatically detected and configured. FireWire 0:00-0:45 FireWire is actually the name Apple gave the IEEE 1394 interface standard when they created it in 1990. IEEE 1394 is also called i.Link or Lynx, but you'll almost always hear it referred to as FireWire. FireWire was designed as a high-speed interface for use with devices that transferred large amounts of data, such as audio and video capture devices. Some external storage devices even adopted FireWire. When it was first released, FireWire was created as an alternative to USB, which had much slower transfer speeds. However, newer versions of USB have since surpassed FireWire's data rates, causing FireWire to be used much less. Now, even though FireWire might seem very similar to USB, it actually has quite a few differences. FireWire Power 0:46-1:02
Image of page 7
One difference is the amount of power that FireWire can supply. USB cables by design provide up to nine watts of power through a five volt line. FireWire cables, on the other hand, provide up to 60 watts of power on a 12 volt line. This is useful because high power devices don't require external power sources.
Image of page 8

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern