Kapalaoa aia i ka poli o näpuu there in the heart of

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Kapalaoa Aia i ka poli o Näpu‘u, There in the heart of Näpu‘u [an older name for the Pu‘uanahulu area], Kekahawai‘oleia. Is Kekahawai‘oleia [a stretch of arid land without water]. Ka pana nö ka la‘a o Pele, This storied place is set apart for Pele, Ka wahine kapukapu o Maunaloa. The sacred woman of Maunaloa. E ö e nä ali‘i, Heed now, O royal ones, Nä ali‘i i ho‘okö ‘ole You nobility who did not fulfill I ke noi, ke noi kö ‘ole ai, The request, not complied to by you, I laila i kai o Kapalaoa. There, seaward of Kapalaoa. I laila i kai o Kapalaoa. Seaward of this place, Kapalaoa. Although this song honors a place, the words are not a typical reference to its physical and intangible beauties. Rather, the song honors the Hawaiian story of the naming of the place. This kind of Hawaiian place song conveys a deeper level of cultural information and strengthens the listener’s relationship to the place.
17 KIMURA | KE KANI A KE AU MAULI HAWAI‘I HOU Peter came up with another tune to set Hawaiian words to. The tune’s concise, sensitive melody reminded me of being in a Hawaiian rain forest, so I scribbled, “Uwë ka Wao (The Forest Weeps).” Kau aku ka mana‘o i ka wao. My thoughts move to the rain forest. ‘O ka honi wale i ke anuhea, Inhaling purely its forest fragrance, ‘O ke koni wale mai a ke këhau, Touched so by damp dew, ‘O ka ua hea pulupë kahi liko o ka wao? What rain drenches the leaf buds of the forest? Because the melody is short and sweet, it allows more instrumental interludes for the ‘ukulele, which was the intent. Again this was a different approach to a Hawaiian kani back in 1969 . I realized that I was among a tiny number of second-language learners of Hawaiian who had an opportunity to compose Hawaiian lyrics for publication. By this time I could converse with my Hawaiian- speaking grandmother in Hawaiian, and she opened my mind to the poetry of Hawaiian songs. We would listen to her old Hawaiian 78 -rpm records, I’d ask her about the meaning of the poetry, and she revealed many invaluable gems of Hawaiian expression. Soon after my undergraduate work at UH –Mänoa in May of 1969 , I was drafted into the US Army. The Vietnam conflict was still going on. I never asked Peter how he avoided the draft, but at that time he got together with Robert and Roland Cazimero to further the kani of Sunday Mänoa. Their album Guava Jam became an instant hit in 1971 , especially influencing a younger generation with a new sound for Hawaiian music (Hopkins, 1978 ). Sunday Mänoa’s fresh rendi- tions of traditional Hawaiian lyric songs sung in the modern harmonization of This kind of Hawaiian place song conveys a deeper level of cultural information and strengthens the listener’s relationship to the place.
18 HÜLILI Vol. 10 ( 2016 ) the Cazimeros, combined with Peter’s ‘ukulele and guitar stylings, pushed the Hawaiian Renaissance to the crest of a wave. The first song on side one of the album was the traditional hula, “Käwika,” in honor of King Kaläkaua. Its lengthy

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