L\u00e1szl\u00f3 Bokor Results of a coffee survey taken in Shrewsbury town centre Page 17

László bokor results of a coffee survey taken in

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László Bokor: Results of a coffee survey taken in Shrewsbury town centre Page | 17 140 litres of water are needed to grow one coffee plant. 140 litres of water equal 1,120 cups of water = 1 cup of coffee drink. The processing of coffee requires extra water. To make a drink out of the coffee needs a cupful more water. (Spiral effects.) It is a concern where these 140 litres of water come from to grow the coffee seeds as Pearce’s calculations are certainly arguable. However, its origin is not an important factor, but the amount of water used is irrespective as this water is to produce the coffee beans only. The extra water and energy required by coffee drink preparation has not even been mentioned yet. (These 140 litres of water also appear in other research papers, such as in C HAPAGAIN , A. K. – H OEKSTRA , A. Y. [2007] and where they also mention an extra 34 litres which amount represents the consumption.) And let us highlight it here once again: most coffee producers are developing countries and many of the growing areas are affected by serious water scarcity (UN W ATER R EPORTS , 2012). 7. Conclusion Like many other areas, the coffee industry has become an individual sector that ‘designs’ specialities. This is a much bigger step away from the original idea and purpose of coffee drink itself. Coffee drinking from many aspects has become an existential thing, in lots of cases a bit of a ‘snob’ culture. Figure 8 is only an example that shows four types of coffee drinks (out of many dozens) that can currently be purchased in a coffee shop. And a closer look certainly reveals how many other ingredients can one count that has major environ- mental impacts. For example: milk, sugar, cocoa, and of course, even more water. Figure 8: Four out of many coffee drink types from the simple to Espresso, the more water and milk requiring Cappuccino and Americano, to the highly complex Caramel Macchiato Source of types and images: C AFEPOINT (2015)
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Double Green Lines / Issue 1, October 2018 / ISSN 2631-6285 (Online) Page | 18 As mentioned among the findings, the number of places in Shrewsbury town centre where one can purchase a coffee drink, within less than two years, has increased from 139 to 152. The Shropshire Council’s Shops Survey in 2012 recorded 88 shops that fell into the category of “restaurant, café and take-away” type. In 2018, this accounts for 121 shops. The increase can only be explained, on the one hand, with the coffee drink increasing popularity and, therefore, demand, and, on the other hand, it is a sign how town centres in the early decades of the 21 st century has increased the meaning of the tertiary economic sector (services) and the focus has shifted towards serving more tourism while looking after capitalism’s main expertise: even more consuming. It must be realised that the growing usage of plastic and, therefore, the (otherwise avoidable) global plastic waste issue is just one specific thing among many environmental concerns. Currently, plastic is the one that is the most highlighted and not without reasons.
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