IAM policies define permissions for an action regardless of the method that you

Iam policies define permissions for an action

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IAM policies define permissions for an action regardless of the method that you use to perform the operation. For example, suppose that you have a policy that allows the iam:GetRole action. A user with that policy can get role information from the AWS Management Console, the AWS CLI, or the AWS API. Identity-Based Policies Identity-based policies are JSON permissions policy documents that you can attach to an identity, such as an IAM user, role, or group. These policies control what actions that identity can perform, on which resources, and under what conditions. To learn how to create an identity-based policy, see Creating IAM Policies in the IAM User Guide . Identity-based policies can be further categorized as inline policies or managed policies . Inline policies are embedded directly into a single user, group, or role. Managed policies are standalone policies that you can attach to multiple users, groups, and roles in your AWS account. Managed policies include AWS managed policies and customer managed policies. To learn how to choose between a managed policy or an inline policy, see Choosing Between Managed Policies and Inline Policies in the IAM User Guide . Other Policy Types AWS supports additional, less-common policy types. These policy types can set the maximum permissions granted to you by the more common policy types. Permissions boundaries – A permissions boundary is an advanced feature in which you set the maximum permissions that an identity-based policy can grant to an IAM entity (IAM user or role). You can set a permissions boundary for an entity. The resulting permissions are the intersection of entity's identity-based policies and its permissions boundaries. Resource-based policies that specify the user or role in the Principal field are not limited by the permissions boundary. An explicit deny in any of these policies overrides the allow. For more information about permissions boundaries, see Permissions Boundaries for IAM Entities in the IAM User Guide . Service control policies (SCPs) – SCPs are JSON policies that specify the maximum permissions for an organization or organizational unit (OU) in AWS Organizations. AWS Organizations is a service for grouping and centrally managing multiple AWS accounts that your business owns. If you enable all features in an organization, then you can apply service control policies (SCPs) to any or all of your accounts. The SCP limits permissions for entities in member accounts, including each AWS account root user. For more information about Organizations and SCPs, see How SCPs Work in the AWS Organizations User Guide . Session policies – Session policies are advanced policies that you pass as a parameter when you programmatically create a temporary session for a role or federated user. The resulting session's permissions are the intersection of the user or role's identity-based policies and the session policies.
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  • Spring '12
  • LauraParker
  • Amazon Web Services, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud

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