Added to the routing table when an interface is

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Added to the routing table when an interface is configured. (displayed in IOS 15 or newer for IPv4 routes and all IOS releases for IPv6 routes.) Directly connected interfaces – Added to the routing table when an interface is configured and active. Static routes – Added when a route is manually configured and the exit interface is active. Dynamic routing protocol – Added when EIGRP or OSPF are implemented and networks are identified.
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Remote Network Routing Entries Interpreting the entries in the routing table
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1.3.2 Directly Connected Routes Directly Connected Interfaces A newly deployed router, without any configured interfaces, has an empty routing table.
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Directly Connected Routing Table Entries
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Directly Connected Example
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Directly Connected IPv6 Example
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13.3 Statically Learned Routes Static Routes Static routes and default static routes can be implemented after directly connected interfaces are added to the routing table: Static routes are manually configured. They define an explicit path between two networking devices. Static routes must be manually updated if the topology changes. Their benefits include improved security and control of resources. Configure a static route to a specific network using the ip route network mask { next-hop-ip | exit-intf } command . A default static route is used when the routing table does not contain a path for a destination network. Configure a default static route using the ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 { exit-intf | next-hop-ip } command. Static Route Example
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Entering and Verifying a Static Route
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Static IPv6 Route Examples
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1.3.4 Dynamic Routing Protocols Dynamic Routing Dynamic routing is used by routers to share information about the reachability and status of remote networks. It performs network discovery and maintains routing tables. Routers have converged after they have finished exchanging and updating their routing tables.
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IPv4 Routing Protocols Cisco routers can support a variety of dynamic IPv4 routing protocols including: EIGRP – Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol OSPF – Open Shortest Path First IS-IS – Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System RIP – Routing Information Protocol Use the router ? Command in global configuration mode to determine which routing protocols are supported by the IOS.
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IPv4 Dynamic Routing Examples IPv6 Routing Protocols Cisco routers can support a variety of dynamic IPv6 routing protocols including: RIPng ( RIP next generation) OSPFv3 EIGRP for IPv6 Use the ipv6 router ? command to determine which routing protocols are supported by the IOS IPv6 Dynamic Routing Examples
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1.4 Chapter Summary Describe the primary functions and features of a router.
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  • Summer '17
  • Miss Ngcobo
  • Router, static routes

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