If the absence is unexpected you are still expected to turn in the assignment

If the absence is unexpected you are still expected

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If the absence is unexpected you are still expected to turn in the assignment via e-mail by the end of the day on which the assignment was due. Additional Information/Resources: Students with Disabilities: The University of Central Florida is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for all persons with disabilities. This syllabus is available in alternate formats upon request. Students with disabilities who need accommodations in this course must contact the professor at the beginning of the semester to discuss needed accommodations. No accommodations will be provided until the student has met with the professor to request accommodations. Students who need accommodations must be registered with Student Disability Services, Student Resource Center Room 132, phone (407) 823-2371, TTY/TDD only phone (407) 823-2116, before requesting accommodations from the professor. Course Ethics: According to UCF Golden Rule guidelines, academic dishonesty/cheating, which includes plagiarism, is a violation of student academic behavior standards and is subject to academic and/or disciplinary action. Such behavior is also a violation of the College of Education’s Professional Code of Conduct (see ). As a result of academic dishonesty in a course, an appropriate grade will be assigned to a student by the letter Z. This policy, applying only to undergraduate courses can be further explained at . Additional References: Calkins, L., Montgomery, K., & Santman, D. (1998). A teacher's guide to standardized reading tests. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Cappuis and Stiggins, R. (2002). “Classroom Assessment for Learning”. Educational Leadership 60(1). Clay, M. M. (1993). An observation survey of early literacy achievement. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Cooper, J.D. & Kiger, N.D. (2001). Literacy assessment: Helping teachers plan instruction. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company. Falk, Beverly. (2000). The heart of the matter: Using standards and assessment to learn. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Farr, R. (1992) “Putting It All Together: Solving the Reading Assessment Puzzle.” Reprinted, 12
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1999, in Reading Assessment, Principles and Practices for Elementary Teachers. Newark, DE: International Reading Association. (Note there are 3 others in this publication) Farstrup, A. E. & Samuels, J. (2002) What research has to say about reading instruction. Newark, DE: International Reading Association. Florida Department of Education. Just Read, Florida ! Document, interim and final report Fountas, I.C. & Pinnell, G.S., (2001). Guided reading and writing: Grades 3-6 teaching comprehension, genre, and content literacy, Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Gaffney, J.S. Ed. (1999). Stirring the waters. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Good, R.H., Kaminski, R. A., Simmons, D., & Kame’enui, E. J. (2001). “Using Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) in an Outcomes-Driven Model.” OSSC Bulletin, 44 (1), 1-24. Grant, J.M., Hieffler, B. & Mereweather, K. (1995). Student-Led conferences. Markham, Ontario: Pembroke Publishers. Guevremont, K. Draft Assessment Module being prepared by UCF for FL DOE. to be published Q1 2003.
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