Everglades National Park-Act Two

Karen mcglathery with the university of virginia

This preview shows page 4 - 7 out of 8 pages.

the carbon in the world’s oceans. Karen McGlathery with the University of Virginia stated that if the seagrass beds are restored that they can successfully and quickly isolate carbon and regenerate lost carbon sinks (Hance, 2012).
Image of page 4

Subscribe to view the full document.

The world’s seagrass beds have been documented as providing vital ecosystem assistance to many habitats and breeding grounds for many marine species, lessening pollution, and changes in water flow, yet these valuable seagrass beds continue to be destroyed. According to a study, almost one third of the seagrass beds have been wiped out by dredging, degradation of water quality, and coastal development. Currently at least 1.5% of seagrass beds are destroyed annually, creating carbon emissions that are equal to a quarter of those created by global deforestation (Hance, 2012). Regional Threat If the ecosystem of the Everglades is not kept in balance it can affect the drinking water for South Florida. The seagrass beds and the wetlands will not be able to filter out the pollutants and absorb the excess nutrients, replenish aquifers, and reduce flooding during the rainy seasons. Besides the quality of water that will be affected, the endangered species will become extinct. Thousands of dollars will be lost in tourism for the state of Florida because the beautiful Everglades National Park will dry up and become a wasteland of dead trees and grass. The Florida Everglades’ biodiversity, natural waterways, and agricultural importance are keys to the South Florida region. The Southern Florida area is dependent on the flourishing ecosystem of the Everglades. Cease Exploitation Activities It is the opinion of many that the exploitation activities in the Everglades need to stop. The continual destruction of the ecosystems in the Everglades will have a lasting effect on this plant. Much planning is required to prevent overexploitation in the Everglades, and all elements need to be considered when finding alternative methods for flood control, agricultural development, and providing quality water for its residences. Educating individuals on the damaging effects of
Image of page 5
exploitation activities on the plants and animals in the Everglades could aid in the way of preserving biodiversity. Defending a Priority Water is crucial to the economy of the State of Florida. Many different species and industries rely on the water that comes from the Everglades. Farmers need it to water their crops and livestock, fishing industries rely on it to provide natural habitats for breeding fish for commercial and recreational use. The residents rely on the water for basic life purposes such as drinking, bathing, and cooking. It is evident that an alternative method is essential to sustain both South Florida and the Everglades thriving.
Image of page 6

Subscribe to view the full document.

Image of page 7
You've reached the end of this preview.
  • Spring '13
  • DennisKostac
  • Conservation Biology, Florida Everglades, everglades, Everglades National Park, seagrass beds

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern