23 In 1988 Gunpei Yokoi and his team at Nintendo RD1 conceived the new Game Boy

23 in 1988 gunpei yokoi and his team at nintendo rd1

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[23] In 1988, Gunpei Yokoi and his team at Nintendo R&D1 conceived the new Game Boy handheld system, with the purpose of merging the two very successful ideas of the Game & Watch's portability along with the NES's cartridge interchangeability. Nintendo released the Game Boy in Japan on 21 April 1989, and in North America on 31 July 1989. Nintendo of America president Minoru Arakawa managed a deal to bundle the popular third party game Tetris along with the Game Boy, and the pair launched as an instant success. In 1989, Nintendo announced plans to release the successor to the Famicom, the Super Famicom . Based on a 16-bit processor , Nintendo boasted significantly superior hardware specifications of graphics, sound, and game speed over the original 8-bit Famicom. The system was also said to have backwards compatibility with Famicom games, though this feature was ultimately cut upon release. The Super Famicom was finally released relatively late to the market in Japan on 21 November 1990, and released as the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (officially abbreviated the Super NES or SNES and commonly shortened to Super Nintendo) in North America on 23 August 1991 and in Europe in 1992. Its main rival was the 16- bit Mega Drive , known in North America as Genesis, which had been advertised aggressively against the nascent 8-bit NES. A console war between Sega and Nintendo ensued during the early 1990s. [24] From 1990 to 1992, Nintendo opened World of Nintendo shops in the United States where consumers could test and buy Nintendo products. In August 1993, Nintendo announced the SNES's successor, code-named Project Reality . Featuring 64-bit graphics , the new system was developed as a joint venture between Nintendo and North-American-based technology company Silicon Graphics . The system was announced to be released by the end of 1995, but was subsequently delayed. Meanwhile, Nintendo continued the Nintendo Entertainment System family with the release of the NES-101 , a smaller redesign of the original NES. Nintendo also announced a CD drive peripheral called the Super NES CD-ROM Adapter , which was co-developed first by Sony with the name "Play Station" and then by Philips . Bearing prototypes and joint announcements at the Consumer Electronics Show , it was on track for a 1994 release, but was controversially cancelled. During 1995, Nintendo announced that it had sold one billion game cartridges worldwide, [25][26] ten percent of those being from the Mario franchise . [ citation needed ] Nintendo deemed 1994 the "Year of the Cartridge". To further their support for cartridges, Nintendo announced that Project Reality, which had now been renamed the Ultra 64, would not use a CD format as expected, but would rather use cartridges as its primary media format. Nintendo IRD general manager Genyo Takeda was impressed by video game development company Rare 's progress with real-time 3D graphics technology, using state of the art Silicon Graphics workstations. As a result, Nintendo bought a 25% stake in the company, eventually expanding to 49%, and offered their catalogue of
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  • Spring '18
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  • Nintendo, Nintendo Co., Nintendo Entertainment, Nintendo DS

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