Managers can use similarities to create bonds with a

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The Application: Uncover real similarities and offer genuine praise. Managers can use similarities to create bonds with a recent hire, the head of another department, or even a new boss. The important thing is to establish the bond early because it creates a presumption of goodwill and trustworthiness in every subsequent encounter. It’s much easier to build support for a new project when the people you’re trying to persuade are already inclined in your favor. Along with cultivating a fruitful relationship, adroit managers can also use praise to repair one that’s damaged or unproductive. Praise, the other reliable generator of affection, both charms and disarms. Sometimes the praise doesn’t even have to be merited. The Principle of Reciprocity The Application: Give what you want to receive If you have ever caught yourself smiling at a coworker just because he or she smiled first, you know how this principle works. gift giving is one of the cruder applications of the rule of reciprocity. In its more sophisticated uses, it confers a genuine first-mover advantage on any manager who is trying to foster positive attitudes and productive personal relationships in the office: Managers can elicit the desired behavior from coworkers and employees by displaying it first. Whether it’s a sense of trust, a spirit of cooperation, or a pleasant demeanor, leaders should model the behavior they want to see from others. The same holds true for managers faced with issues of information delivery and resource allocation. If you lend a member of your staff to a colleague who is shorthanded and staring at a fast-approaching deadline, you will significantly increase your chances of getting help when you need it. The Principle of Social Proof People follow the lead of similar others. Social creatures that they are, human beings rely heavily on the people around them for cues on how to think, feel, and act. persuasion can be extremely effective when it comes from peers. The science supports what most sales professionals already know: Testimonials from satisfied customers work best when the satisfied customer and the prospective customer share similar circumstances. That lesson can help a manager faced with the task of selling a new corporate initiative. Imagine that you’re trying to streamline your department’s work processes. A group of veteran employees is resisting. Rather than try to convince the employees of the move’s merits yourself, ask an old-timer who supports the initiative to speak up for it at a team meeting. The compatriot’s testimony stands a much better chance of convincing the group than yet another
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speech from the boss. Stated simply, influence is often best exerted horizontally rather than vertically The Principle of Consistency: People align with their clear commitments.
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