Children of affluence enjoy healthcare environmental

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children of affluence enjoy healthcare, environmental, and educational advantages over the poor. After college, most affluent children enter white-collar jobs while most working-class children get blue-collar jobs Woodrow Wilson's recommendation that schools separate a small upper class from the masses that are needed to perform manual tasks is being realized. Social mobility grew after 1945. People had a better chance of moving upward in society. Social class is the single most important variable in society Rich children vs. poor children schooling social class strongly correlates to SAT scores affluent Americans also have longer life expectancies than lower- and working-class people, the largest single cause of which is better access to health care Although rich himself, James Madison worried about social inequality and wrote The Federalist #10 to explain how the proposed government would not succumb to the influence of the affluent. Knowledge of the social-class system also reduces the tendency of Americans from other social classes to blame the victim for being poor Americans unconsciously grant respect to the educated and successful. A huge body of research confirms that education is dominated by the class structure and operates to replicate that structure in the next generation The biting quip "If you're so smart, why aren't you rich?" conveys the injury done to the self-image of the poor when the idea that America is a meritocracy goes unchallenged in school. In the United States the richest fifth of the population earns eleven times as much income as the poorest fifth 1 Percent of the population controls 40% of the wealth textbooks minimize social stratification and fail to show the benefits of free enterprise
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