The Public Key Cryptography Standards PKCS are a set of inter vendor standard

The public key cryptography standards pkcs are a set

This preview shows page 49 - 51 out of 92 pages.

The Public-Key Cryptography Standards (PKCS) are a set of inter-vendor standard protocols for making possible secure information exchange on the Internet using a public key infrastructure (PKI). When combined with a private key that is mathematically linked to the public key, messages and digital signatures can be effectively encrypted. The use of combined public and private keys is known as asymmetric cryptography. Digital Certificate A digital certificate is an electronic "passport" that allows a person, computer or organization to exchange information securely over the Internet using the public key infrastructure (PKI). A digital certificate may also be referred to as a public key certificate. Just like a passport, a digital certificate provides identifying information. It is forgery resistant and can be verified because it was issued by an official, trusted agency. The certificate contains the name of the certificate holder, a serial number, expiration dates, a copy of the certificate holder's public key (used for encrypting messages and digital signatures) and the digital signature of the certificate-issuing authority (CA) so that a recipient can verify that the certificate is real.
Image of page 49
50 | P a g e To provide evidence that a certificate is genuine and valid, it is digitally signed by a root certificate belonging to a trusted certificate authority. Operating systems and browsers maintain lists of trusted CA root certificates so they can easily verify certificates that the CAs have issued and signed. When PKI is deployed internally, digital certificates can be self- signed. Digital Signature A digital is a mathematical technique used to validate the authenticity and integrity of a message, software or digital document. The digital equivalent of a handwritten signature or stamped seal, but offering far more inherent security. A digital signature is intended to solve the problem of tampering and impersonation in digital communications. Digital signatures can provide the added assurances of evidence to origin, identity and status of an electronic document, transaction or message, as well as acknowledging informed consent by the signer. In many countries digital signatures have the same legal significance as the more traditional forms of signed documents. How digital signatures work Digital signatures are based on public key cryptography, also known as asymmetric cryptography. Using a public key algorithm, one can generate two keys that are mathematically linked: one private and one public. To create a digital signature, signing software (such as an email program) creates a one-way hash of the electronic data to be signed. The private key is then used to encrypt the hash. The encrypted hash along with other information, such as the hashing algorithm is the digital signature.
Image of page 50
Image of page 51

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 92 pages?

  • Spring '19
  • Electronic Data Interchange, EDI Network Services Provider

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes