Specific methods include television programs song lyrics videotapes audiotapes

Specific methods include television programs song

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material in advance for appropriateness and to devise questions for participants. Specific methods include: television programs, song lyrics, videotapes, audiotapes, pictures, slides, films, film strips, three-dimensional models, posters, demonstration objects, overhead transparencies, multi-media presentations using computers, photos, board displays anddiagrams, flip chart papers. The class views the presentation and follows with discussion, role-play, etc. Limitations: The facilitator must spend time reviewing the material prior to class presentation. Special equipment is often needed and mustbe arranged prior to class time.[edit]Guest SpeakersDescription: A way of bringing new ideas and people into the classroom. When Used: When someone other than the facilitator is an expert in a field and is available for guest appearances. Procedure: The class leader and guest speaker discuss the topic to be covered and details of the class time, how the topic fits into the course, etc. The guest speaker may appear virtually, through videoconferencing or on Sakai discussions. Limitations: Guest speakers are often difficult tofit into the class schedule and often require travel expenses be paid.[edit]Team TeachingDescription: A way of bringing new ideas and people into the classroom. Similar to guest speakers, but the speaker is involved in the class for more than one session. When Used: When two or more facilitators can effectively combine their interests and areas of expertise, and share the class time and work. Procedure: The facilitators decide who covers each topic and when sessions will be conducted. Each is responsible for a section; sections are taught independently except
for discussion on how sections flow together. Limitations: Requires a coordinated effort by the team members or it may be very disjointed.[edit]Socratic MethodDescription: A dialogue in which the leader asks leading questions of the group. When Used: To vary the routine of a regular class and when class participation is desired. Procedure: The facilitator prepares a topic for discussion, then leads the class through it by asking leading questions. Limitations: The facilitator carries the responsibility for the progress of the discussion, and must be well-prepared with questions.[edit]DemonstrationsDescription: A visual way of presenting information to a group; often supplements a written presentation or lecture. When Used: When a topic or idea will have more direct impact if presented visually. Procedure: The facilitator either prepares the demonstration or asks a guest to do so. Limitations: All group members must be able to see the demonstration clearly. It must be rehearsed to work smoothly on the presentation day.[edit]Case StudiesDescription: An actual account of a particular incident and/or problem is presented to the class. How the matter was resolved is included. When Used: When a specific example is the best means of illustrating a topic. This method is often used to supplement traditional lecture approaches to a topic. Can be used to synthesize ideas and apply theory to

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