analyze closely all the facts of plague contagion that history or even memoirs

Analyze closely all the facts of plague contagion

This preview shows page 4 - 7 out of 21 pages.

analyze closely all the facts of plague contagion that history or even memoirs provide us with, it would be difficult to  isolate one actually verified instance of contagion by  4 S.v. Encyclopædia Britannica Online, "Antonin Artaud", accessed June 02, 2015, .
Image of page 4
5 contact.”  5 This selection might seem farfetched or odd, but through a deeper examination it  becomes clear that Artaud is using this as a metaphor for something bigger. Artaud’s  shows a belief that the effects of the disease are just as great as the actual disease; the  constant fear and chaos brought forth by the plague bring on as much pain and hurt as the legions and fevers. Living in constant fear of something takes a toll on the mind, which  consequently has a result on the body. Artaud calls this belief “spiritual physiognomy.” 6  I definitely agree with this belief of spiritual physiognomy. The plague durig the 16 th  and  17 th  century was a very scary and real thing to everyone, there was constant fear of  contracting the disease and as a result it forced people to act differently around others,  and just in everyday life. Another Historian Francis Aiden Gasquet, had a belief that rats  and fleas were responsible for bringing the plague to England, similar to the Roman  Empire. 7  I also agree with this belief. Even though there is no actual way to prove that  this was the reason as to why the plague began to spread, there is so much evidence  backing the fact that rats and some insects carry diseases, so why couldn’t they transport  those said diseases to people. Some of the belief I don’t actually believe in are of the  more archaic type, such as the beliefs that God was responsible for the plague, or that it  5 Ian Munro, “The City and Its Double: Plague Time in Early Modern London,” In English Literary Renaissance, ed. Kinney, Arthur. (New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell, 2008), 246. 6 Munro, “The City and Its Double,” 247. 7 “Black Death,” , accessed June 8, 2015, - content/uploads/2011/06/Black-Death.pdf  
Image of page 5
6 was a result of the queen’s death outlined further along in this paper. Those two beliefs  can never be proven and as a result has no actual backing, they are just merely theories  proposed by citizens of the 16 th  and 17 th  centuries. In all, many historians have differing  views on the plague, but my ultimate beliefs stick with those of more modern times such  as Antonin Artuad and Francis Aiden Gasquet.
Image of page 6
Image of page 7

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 21 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes