The blockade began just as an arms shipment was

This preview shows page 3 - 4 out of 16 pages.

The blockade began just as an arms shipment was arriving in Mexico from Germany. Germany became outraged that America was involved in a business deal between themselves and Mexico. In response Wilson ordered American marines to take over the port of Veracruz and capture the weapons. In the fire fight 126 Mexicans were killed. In July 1914 Huerta resigned and went into exile, unable to get the weapons he needed from anywhere. As the Mexican Revolution continued, however, America was once again dragged into the fight. In January of 1916, 15 American engineers were shot by Pancho Villa and his men in northern Mexico. Two months later, Villa invaded the border town of Columbus, New Mexico and killed 19 Americans. In response you ordered General Pershing to invade and arrest Villa. After 6 months searching and getting no closer to capturing him, WWI broke out. You withdrew Pershing and sent him to Europe to fight in WWI. Even though your 1916 reelection campaign slogan was, “He Kept Us Out of War”, you felt that America needed to be involved. American forces were only actively involved in the War for 6 months, but when the Treaty of Versailles was negotiated in Paris, you attended. Keeping Moral Internationalism in mind, you created the 14 Points . The 14 Points were a progressive peace plan. Some of the main points were peace without victory , freedom of the seas , and the formation of the League of Nations. Peace without victory argued that everyone suffered during the war and everyone was responsible, so peace should be declared and everyone should rebuild
Image of page 3

Subscribe to view the full document.

their countries. Freedom of the seas argued that every nation should be able to go anywhere in the world. The League of Nations was the most far reaching and controversial of the 14 Points. It called for the creation of a council of nations where problems would be discussed between all countries. The idea was breathtaking. In short, it was believed that this League could end war, end poverty, and end hunger, by uniting all countries together in a one world democracy. Seeing the League of Nations as a path to destruction. Senator Henry Cabot Lodge and other Isolationists , people who felt that America should never be involved in the political affairs of other countries, attacked you and the League. They saw the League as dragging America into international conflict after international conflict. They felt that America as the leader of the world economically and militarily would lead American boys to die in far away places for causes that did not involve the USA. You led a vigorous campaign to save the League, it cost you your life. You rode all over the country giving whistle stop speeches in favor of the League. It caused you to have a stroke and left you incapacitated in the White House for 7 months before you died. The League of Nations was not ratified by the USA.
Image of page 4
You've reached the end of this preview.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern