P J 1 A T j y J i 1 I I I 11 16000 I t j ji l ii L2000 j 8000 4000 CIISTGNCE

P j 1 a t j y j i 1 i i i 11 16000 i t j ji l ii

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;. ,,’” .:. ., : .. / - ----- P- ,:J 1,~ ‘-/: ‘ _:. -+.-+ ~ .A’-T ]-: j , _’ ~,,, y “J, i- 1 I I I ‘1.1 ‘16000. I . t :---j- ‘;., ‘.,;, ““j”i l,” ~:i,i., : ., .::.. -L”2000, j“ -8000, -4000. 0 CIISTGNCE FROH RIINLKW THPFsm?n IF~FTI
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4.3 LESSONS LEARNED FROM WINDSHEAR ENCOUNTERS 4.3.3 ENCOUNTER ON APPROACH 4.3.3.2 STUDY CASE ANALYSIS o Vlhy was the airplane allowed to descend? The crew’s performance during the windshear encounter on approach and landing was affected by these six important factors. 1) 2) Limited time for recognition and action The critical portion of the windshear encounter (Figure 4.3-7), began approximately 6,000 ft before runway threshold with the airplane approximately 400 ft above the ground. The airplane contacted the ground 2,000 ft from the runway threshold. Windshear recove~ action needed to begin at least 5 sec before the point at which the airplane contacted the aground. Therefore, the flight crew had a maximum of 13 sec in this case to recognize the windshear and respond correctly. Dif15culty of recognizing windshear The pilot may not immediately have been able to distinguish between the serious nature of the situation shown in Figure 4.3-7 and past experience with rough weather penetration. Fluctuations in airspeed and glidepath error are expected in an approach through heavy turbulence. A continual scan of airspeed, attitude, altitude, vertical speed, and engine instruments is required for timely windshear recognition.
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4.3 LESSONS LEARNED FROM WINDSHEAR ENCOUNTERS 4.3.3 ENCOUNTER ON APPROACH 4.3.3.2 STUDY CASE ANALYSIS Three points ofinterest during thewindshear encounterhavebeen identifiedinFi=we 4.3-10: Point A, Point B, and Point C. A discussion of events at these three points wd.1 provide insightintothe difficulty ofwindshear recognition.
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Figure 4.3-10 Approach Accident Profile I+ERDUINO v UPIIROFT DOUNll&)FT 1000. 800. I 1- W ~ 600. ., g- Ow Co w ~ 400. .. El a 200. . 0- 200. T l-u Lo E? u- 0 &l- .1- aa I 1- IJJ z 10000. 1 K . :. ,. ,.., II l“t”~ ..-—, . ...... ...4 . . . . . . :.. . { I I I ,: I v-~N 1 1 -,, J -16000. -12000. . -aoou. -4000. D 1“ .,-, . .-. ........... ----: ........ .. ——’— -.$ .-,. 1 [ -- -4 . -- ,. ,. .-LA . .... _.: r I..- bl--l’--i-:- i-. I I 1 I I F \ I t 1“ [ I I i 1“ t I I I I ! I ~ I I ,,. . . [ t I I 1. I { 1: l“-kl-l -’-k-l-:-: - I:J4J-+ I - . ;. ,,,., ..-. --- .,’: .,--7 := -.. -—..—. :-._, j ~:” - , . _;... :;_ ... . :_: .:, .. ... ;..-” .. .. : ,,-, .,. I . . :-. —. - --- ...-.’ “. .,, ;.- , 1 1 ,. 1 ! . . . .. ..._,_.._ —- t ---- -1, ’.,.- :-- .-, -- ,-:+ .- ,: I -16000. -12000. -Booo. -4000. 0 ,, ,, ., i-.-,.=,;;. : ... ... , .--, .... .:: ,.;- ..”_.. .:.:.. , __ ,, ; _, _- _: T .-: .. -,-, . .- ... .,. . -.. . .,. .,. -- ~:. . .-. . . .=. ~.. . : !, ---- . ,. - . ..- —. . . :..’ .:..- -. . -. ,. 1 ~ - > ~ . ~~ I. ~~ -:1’:’1- “,..1::. :’”-1- “.- 1 I I 1 1 1 I I I r f f I r 1 1 1. I i I I -16000. -12000. -8000. -4000. 0 DISTGNCE FROII RUNI.MV THRESHOLD (FEETI
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4.3 LESSONS LEARNED FROM WINDSHEAR ENCOUNTERS 4.3.3 ENCOUNTER ON APPROACH 4.3.3.2 STUDY CASE ANALYSIS Point A Figure 4.3-11 presents a view of the flight instruments as they may have appeared at point A on the approach. A significant downdraft had been encountered and the aircraft’s vertical speed had increased to approximately 1,200 FPM down. The only sign at this point that a problem was developing was the high sink rate. All other indications appeared normal. Initial signs of a severe windshear encounter may not be accompanied by a distinct change in airspeed.
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Figure 4.3-11 Initial Downdraft Encounter Pilot’s View Point A
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4.3 LESSONS LEARNED FROM WINDSHEAR ENCOUNTERS 4.3.3 ENCOUNTER ON APPROACH 4.3.3.2 STUDY CASE ANALYSIS Point B Figure 4.3-12 presents a view of the flight instruments as they may have appeared at point B on the approach.
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  • Winter '16
  • George Bouckovalas
  • Air safety, Microburst, Wind shear

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