2 Cuba and the United States a Recognizing Cubas independence from Spain the

2 cuba and the united states a recognizing cubas

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2. Cuba and the United States a. Recognizing Cuba’s independence from Spain, the 1898 Teller Amendment declared that the U.S. did not intend to take over any part of Cuba. The Treaty of Paris of 1898, which brought an end to the Spanish-American war, further guaranteed Cuba’s independence. b. Although “independent,” American troops remained in Cuba along with Spanish officials holding Cuban office. Many Cubans protested this, saying that the U.S. was just taking Spain’s place in dominating Cuban politics. Nevertheless, the U.S. provided significant aid to Cuba, such as food, clothing, and improving sanitation and medical research. This helped eliminate yellow fever, which had previously killed hundreds of Cubans each year. Do you think the U.S. was justified in holding a presence in Cuba? Was it for their own good? c. The U.S. army would not withdraw its troops until Cuba adopted the Platt Amendment into its Constitution, which would make Cuba a U.S. protectorate (a country whose affairs are partially controlled by a stronger power). Specifically, the Platt Amendment stated that Cuba could not make treaties that might limit its independence or permit a foreign power to control any part of its territory (besides the U.S.), Cuba could not go into unrepayable debt, and that the U.S. could buy or lease land in Cuba for naval stations and refueling stations. Although many protested this, the Platt Amendment would remain
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  • Summer '16
  • Tom McGrath
  • US History, Acquisition, Treaty of paris, Spanish–American War

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