Bohemia and Hungary 7 Why were the Austrian Habsburgs much less successful than

Bohemia and hungary 7 why were the austrian habsburgs

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Bohemia and Hungary 7. Why were the Austrian Habsburgs much less successful than the Prussian Hohenzollerns in building an absolutist state? No centralized gov’t 8. Explain this sentence: “Turks became a negative reference group with whom Europeans could compare themselves.” Europeans did not consider Turks “western”, they had a different religion-Muslim, thought to rule subjects as slaves ( oriental despotism ), and thought the sultans were vicious 9. In what ways was the European stereotype of Ottoman rule incorrect? The sultans really authorized very little power, they shared it with grand vizier, due to Muslim beliefs 10. How and why did Peter I (Peter the Great) westernize Russia? He was influenced by Europe when he went there for a visit Men had to cut their beards, women were allowed to participate in cultural gatherings, boys studied abroad, dressed in western clothing, smoked, appointed 12 governors, religious uniformity, military reforms, primogeniture - land passed down 11. Encounters and Transformations: St. Petersburg and the West. What is the cultural encounter described here? Who or what did this encounter transform? Russia and the west It transformed Russia. Built St. Petersburg Resistance to Absolutism in England and the Dutch Republic [Note: the section on England goes into an enormous amount of detail. Do not let yourself get overwhelmed. Just be able to answer the questions I pose here.] 1. According to Professor Levack (the author of this chapter), what were the two great exceptions to absolutism rule in early modern Europe? England and Netherlands 2. In what ways did England’s parliamentary system of government stand as an obstacle to absolutist rule?
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The king could not make new laws or tax w/out its consent 3. Why did some members of the House of Commons fear that Charles I sought to end England’s tradition of parliamentary government? Charles I made his people lend money for war, got taxes from exports all with out parliament approval. He dismissed the parliament and had a time of personal rule . 4. King Charles I and the members of Parliament had numerous arguments between 1625 and 1640, but these arguments really all boil down to two main issues—which were what? Parliament was thought the king was conspiring against them and they wanted to approve all royal appointments 5. Who fought whom during the English Civil War? Who won? [Again, don’t get bogged down in detail. You don’t need to know all the various ins and outs of the “first” and “second” civil wars or of the various religious factions.] The King/Royalist vs. Parliamententarians Parliamentarians won 6. Was the English revolution of 1649 a democratic revolution? Why or why not? No, the Parliament got rid of the monarchy and created a republic 7. Justice in History: The Trial of Charles I.
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  • Fall '10
  • Nero
  • Parliament, Absolute monarchy, Monarchy, Charles I of England

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