P consonant sound is repeated in the lines i saw p

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“p” consonant sound is repeated in the lines: “I saw Pale kings, and Princes too/ Pale warriors, death Pale were they all” (Michael J. Cummings). There is more to poetic sound devices than just alliteration in “La Belle Dame Sans Merci”, it is just Keats makes this type of figurative language the most apparent.“La Belle Dame Sans Merci” is full of poetic sound devices. Line thirty three is a prime example; there is onomatopoeia of sorts in this line. “The word ‘lulled’ is such a sleepy soundingword that it’s an onomatopoeia because it sounds like what it is supposed to mean” (“Dreams andSleep”). Repetition is not a new literary device to appear in Keats’ works. In “La Belle Dame Sans Merci” he uses repetition more than once, i.e.: lines thirty four through thirty five. “The word ‘dream’ gets repeated three times in only two lines. This cannot be an accident. Maybe the knight is insisting that the dream is not a dream, but a real event” (“Dreams and Sleep”). A consonance is another type of poetic sound device. In lines thirty seven through forty the word
pale is repeated several times. “The repetition of ‘pale’ brings out the similarity between the word and the words ‘all’, ‘belle’, and ‘thrail’. This consonance makes the reader pause to consider now the “belle dame” might be responsible for the ‘paleness’ of “all” the knights she has had ‘in thrail’” (“Paleness”). “La Belle Dame Sans Merci” contains many sound devices in the poem.Rhetorical language is not very apparent in “La Belle Dame Sans Merci”, though there are a few visible devices. As stated before the word ‘pale’ has been repeated several times in the poem; In the tenth stanza it is repeated three times, the pale men represent an allusion. The allusion pertains to the fourth horseman of the Apocalypse that is describes in the Book of Revelation; the fourth horseman is death and he rides a pale horse (“John Keats,” saylor.org). Another allusion in the poem occurs in line twenty-six; it says that the lady fed the night “MannaDew”. “’Manna’ is the heavenly food that the Jewish Scriptures say that the Israelites ate in the wilderness after they escaped from slavery”(“Dew and Water”). “La Belle Dame Sans Merci” also contains a bit of spice and it is not an allusion though still rhetorical language. In line 18,” “a fragrant zone” is a flower belt- it’s another string of flowers that the knight offers the fairy lady; but it could also be a euphemism for her anatomical ‘zone’ underneath the belt” (“DramaticFlowers”).The poem begins with someone asking the knight what is wrong with him and why is he out alone. Next in the ballad the knight appears to be sick, but it becomes apparent that the unknown speaker is “La Belle Dame”. The knight explains how he has met a beautiful, “fairy-like” lady in the fields; she has long hair and wild eyes (“John Keats,” saylor.org). The knight makes a flower wreath for the lady, showing there is a love that grows between the two. Next,

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