4 th 1765 quartering act permitted military

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- 4 th -1765 Quartering Act: Permitted military commanders to lodge soldiers wherever necessary, even in private households. - 5 th -The Quebec Act offended many Americans because it gave Roman Catholic Quebec control of the Ohio Valley (claimed by Virginia, Pennsylvania, and other Native tribes,) and continuation of French civil law. - The Coercive Acts spread alarm among the colonists because the colonists feared their liberties were insecure. Beyond Boston: Rural New England - Farmers also protested in Massachusetts – crowds of men prevented the opening of county courts run by crown-appointed jurists; judges were forced to resign and run a humiliating gauntlet. - Town militias prepared for a conflict, stepped up drills. - Towns withheld tax money from royal governor and diverted to military supplies. - The “power alarm” of September 1774 convinced Governor Thomas Gage that ordinary colonists would unite for armed conflict. - Gage sent troops to a town outside of Boston rumored to have a hidden powder storehouse; rumors spread that troops fired upon defenders of powder, killing 6m men; within 24 hours, thousands of armed men from Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Connecticut came to Boston; story cleared, men went home. - Gage asked for reinforcements, Parliament didn’t believe colonists could organize as they did. The First Continental Congress - Delegates included Samuel Adams, John Adams, George Washington, and Patrick Henry; some colonists sent conservatives to keep the congress from being too radical. - Delegates tried to figure out how to respond to the Coercive Acts – 7 weeks, declaration of rights: “peace, liberty, and security” and no new rights. - To British, American assumed rights – no Parliament representation, colonial government had right to govern and tax its own people – were radical. - Delegates “cheerfully consent” to trade regulation as long as it was not a sneaky way to raise revenue. - Delegates agreed to slowly boycott, had Continental Association in each town to enforce boycotts with tar and feathers.
- Many Americans who supported the patriot cause accepted the legitimacy of the committees of public safety, the regrouped colonial assemblies, and the Continental Congress because the new governing bodies were composed of many of the same men who had held elective office before. V. DOMESTIC INSURRECTIONS, 1774 – 1775 - General Thomas Gage sent soldiers to Lexington and Concord (ammunition depot) - Slaves – opportunity against owners. Lexington and Concord - Boycotts continued in Winter 1774 – 1775. - Some colonists began to build up arms and ammunition. - Massachusetts – Militia: minutemen – respond at a minute’ notice. - General Gage reacted to the increased violence and collapsing royal authority in Massachusetts in 1775 by requesting 20,000 additional troops from England.

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