valuation of ecosystem goods and services in terms of the resulting changes in

Valuation of ecosystem goods and services in terms of

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valuation of ecosystem goods and services, in terms of the resulting changes in management practices andecosystem conditions; or to apply such monitoring in a standardized way across sectors and instruments, as wouldbe required in order to determine overall net inter-sector impacts. Barrier 3: Local actors have inadequate experience of integrated approaches capable of optimizing flows andecosystem goods and services43.Although a very large resource of knowledge and experience has been generated in Cuba over the last 10-20years in relation to sustainable natural resource management, this has largely been sector- and focal area-specific,and as a consequence has not adequately considered the net and cumulative implications of resource managementdecisions and the interrelations (both positive and negative) between sectors and focal areas. This mirrors at locallevel the compartmentalization at national level, described under Barrier 1 above. At this level, the problem lieswith the narrowness of vision and experience of technicians belonging to sector ministries (such as MINAG, MINAL,MINEM, MINTUR and CITMA), as well as representatives of local and regional governments (OLPP) and productiveentities. As a consequence, productive initiatives in one sector may, for example, undermine the viability andsustainability of other sectors, or may generate unintended negative impacts on actors located in other parts of thelandscape. Even when sector development actors are aware of the potential for such impacts, they may lack thetechnical knowledge and information required to allow them to plan and implement effective mitigation measures.18This platform will be promoted and strengthened by the UNDP/GEF project “Integrating Rio global environmentalcommitments into national priorities and needs through the improvement of information management and knowledge forplanning and decision making” (GEF project 9319).17 | P a g e
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III.STRATEGYConceptual framework for project design44.The project design process has been guided by the Resilience, Adaptation Pathways and TransformationAssessment" Framework (RAPTA)19, as shown in Appendix XIII.Selected approach45.In order for the threats described above to be addressed effectively and for the needs of the diversestakeholders involved to be balanced objetively and equitatively, it is essential for an integrated landscape-widemanagement approach to be applied, which recognises the complex spatial dimensions of the processes that drivethe threats, while at the same time focusing on mainstreaming environmental considerations into the managementpractices of production sectors with particular potential to generate threats to global environmental values. It alsorequires decision-making and planning to be based on sound information regarding the status and functioning ofthe ecosystems in question and the threats that affect them, as well as the nature and magnitude of the goods and
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