Shelleys supernatural processes can be interpreted in

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Shelley’s supernatural processes can be interpreted in many ways: a parody of God’s creation out of clay, an evil birth scene, but no matter how this scene is interpreted the fact remains that she keeps it a mystery. It is precisely in these processes that Shelley succeeded. If Shelley had divulged Victor’s secret, that could have killed the supernatural by making it too scientific. But her mysteries remain such and Victor’s association with alchemy manages to seduce the reader into thinking that there was more than science involved in the creation. Frankenstein could be considered a science fiction novel because it focuses on a scientist and the search for scientific truth. However, it remains a Gothic novel. The supernatural in early Gothic fiction was always combined with an eerie atmosphere and mysterious settings in order to enhance the effects of the novel. Sometimes the elements that form the setting challenge the plot as the most relevant characteristic. The first and foremost characteristic of setting and one that in a way defines Gothic appearance is location. Setting could be divided for the sake of the argument into two different and equally important aspects: buildings and location. The importance of the building in early Gothic fiction is essential for the development of Gothic fiction. But also of great importance is the time when the events take place. In the Gothic, especially in its earlier mode there was a tendency to move novels out of England and into some remote location. The preference for exotic locations is not exclusive to Gothic writers and it certainly did not start in the Gothic era. In the catalogue of writers who employed exotic settings and faraway lands Shakespeare stands out as the best
65example. It is also important to note that the conditions that enabled the great century of colonization and expansion were developing during this period. The description in Gothic literature of exotic elements as part of the essence of the foreign paved the way for the grand narratives of the British Empire. The first change in setting involved substituting other settings for the traditional castle. It could be argued that Shelley replaced the castle with the psychological landscapes of her characters. This certainly makes sense when considering the fact that, as discussed earlier, her characters are whole entities with actual inner struggles. Although this could be counted as a change, her real contribution was introducing new locations as centers of evil. The imprint these locations left on the psychology of the reader in a way helped establish Frankensteinas a popular modern myth. First there is Victor’s laboratory. The place is not sufficiently described by Shelley in the novel but the effects on Victor would have been enough to justify its inclusion. Described as a “solitary chamber, or rather cell, at the top of the house and separated from all the others apartments by a gallery and staircase” (32), the laboratory

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