4 Parents use red herring fallacies all the time when reasoning with children

4 parents use red herring fallacies all the time when

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4. Parents use red herring fallacies all the time when reasoning with children or trying to turn their attention to something else for example, Don't worry about that toy, we have candy in the car. The media uses them as well. An example of a red herring fallacy is: We can't worry about the global warming right now, there's a war coming. Using the upcoming war distracts the reader and causes them to focus on the possibility of an upcoming war instead of the dangerous things we are doing as humans that's damaging our world. Red herrings are meant to do just that. They are used in arguments to move the reader off the original subject in hopes they will go to something else leaving the original argument alone. Red herrings can sometimes be hard to identify but if you look closely the usually point themselves out by bringing a new argument into the conversation. The red herring is used at the point the conversation turns to a new subject or argument.5. We must first avoid reusing or rewriting them when doing our research. Logical fallacies should not be repeated or brought into an argument unless it's to describe what they are. We also have to be careful not to rush research when gathering data to make sure we don't end up with a hasty generalization frombeing to broad on a specific topic or too narrow on broad topics. We can be much more attentive while reading and watching other arguments to pick up on the logically fallacies present. This will make us
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better writers and help us to avoid using them ourselves if we can pick them up from other places. We also need to be very careful about writing statements that appeal to the emotions of our readers or invoking fear among the readers because it can add logical fallacies without intention, such as appealing to emotions. I need to watch because there's many times I read or hear something and expect it to be true without doing the ample amount of research into the subject.
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  • Summer '18
  • Philosophy, Red Herring, slippery slope fallacy

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