Here are some other ways to promote questions make

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Here are some other ways to promote questions: Make students who ask questions feel like they have done you a favor by asking a question. Reward students for asking a question. Try saying, "That's a great question" for every new question you get. Leave gaps for questions that are long enough for students to actually formulate questions. Rustle through your notes or drop a pencil or erase the board - leave good sized gaps throughout your lectures. Do not insult students, even subtly, when answering a question. Take a tape recorder to class one day, and then play it back and listen to how you answer questions. How do you come across? Would you like to be talked to in that way? Put yourself in your students' shoes. Also listen to the answers you give - do you answer the questions?
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Use questionnaires at the end of class. Ask your students to write down one thing that they don't understand from that day's class. Then go over those questions at the beginning of the next class. Once students realize that everyone has questions, they will be more inclined to ask questions vocally during class. Have your students work problems during class. Put a problem on the board and let students work it in their notes. Then show them the right answer. You can do examples all day, but nothing is learned until the students do a problem themselves. It shows them exactly what they don't understand, and this often leads to questions. Make lists of questions that you get asked during your office hours, and then repeat those questions to everyone during the next class. Give homework assignments that force students to think about and question the material, and make time available in class to answer homework questions. If a homework assignment generates no questions, then it is probably useless. Use tests to find out where you have been unclear, and where questions remain. A well designed and well graded test tells you as much about your teaching as it does about your students. Start each class by briefly reviewing the material from the previous class. Introduce a difficult concept for 5 minutes at the end of class. Then cover the concept fully during the next class. Students will have a day or two to become familiar with the concept, and will be more inclined to ask questions when they see it again. A good question-asking environment is a fragile and delicate thing. It must be nurtured every day. Once a good environment is created however, it can make a significant contribution to the quality of your class. Questioning is a natural behaviour and it starts from a very early age when we are children and continues till the end. We ask questions, simply because we need answers. Questions are asked for various reasons in various situations when one is searching for solutions, answers, information etc. They are basic tools that help humans grow and develop. Questions can be asked to gain knowledge, to clarify doubts, to know the reality or truth behind an incident, out of curiosity, to make complicated issues simpler, to resolve issues, to start a conversation, to share ideas, to make a plan, etc. Children
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  • Summer '18
  • dalal
  • Speed reading, Scholar Base

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