The majority party elects the Senate Majority Leader When the majority leader

The majority party elects the senate majority leader

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structure as the House of Representatives. The majority party elects the Senate Majority Leader. When the majority leader is from the president’s party, the president becomes the party’s most visible leader on Capitol Hill (Magleby, D., Light, P., and Nemacheck, C., 2015). How a Bill becomes a Law A bill may begin in either the House of Representative or the Senate except for money bills, which must be introduced in the House, according to How A Bill Becomes a Law (2017). The first step in the process is drafting a bill and introducing it to the House, but only members of the House can introduce the bill. Next, the Speaker of the House for Committee action sends it to the Committee. If the bill passes this stage it goes to the Rules Committee where the rules of debate and when the bill will come up for debate are determined, then, the floor action where the House debates and/or amends the bill. Then, the Senator introduces the bill to the Senate, which is sent to Committee. If the bill is voted to proceed it will be called up for the whole Senate to consider. Once debated and/or amended on the Senate floor it is returned to the House for the changes to be reviewed by the Conference Committee. Then, the bill moves to a vote where both Houses must approve the changes made by the Conference Committee. The final step in the
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OVERVIEW OF THE U.S. CONGRESS 4 process is Presidential action, where the President either approves the bill or vetoes the bill. If the bill is vetoed, the bill can still become law if two thirds of both Houses vote to override.
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OVERVIEW OF THE U.S. CONGRESS 5 Reference ushistory.org (2018). The Powers of Congress. American Government Online Textbook . Retrieved from Light, P. C., Magleby, D. B., & Nemacheck, C. L. (2015). Government by the People. 2014 Elections and Updates Edition , 628. Retrieved from Longley, Robert. (2016, August 23). About The United States Congress. Retrieved from Checks and Balances. (2017). In Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved from How a Bill Becomes a Law. (2017). Retrieved from
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  • United States Congress, United States House of Representatives, U.S. Senate

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