And then acting accordingly and limiting other

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and then acting accordingly and limiting other options, or by just creating something for one need without having awareness, interest or care for other potential needs or use scenarios. In case example areas (industries etc.) were applied, both models have proven cases that both approaches work and both have validated great successes in commercial terms, so it’s more about strategy choice on what approach works better in where. However all of the more open models are newer direction, with more scalability build in and are typically used and created as solutions to limitations existing in the older/closed models. Because there are actually quite few IPR’s that are not “shareable” or “multipliable” (ie. can only have one unique thing existing, like domain name, phone number etc.), majority of IPR are actually easily sharable and duplicable if chosen to do so. So the question is, why are those not more openly shared & distributed? The traditional thinking may say, that because limiting the sharing, the unshared IPR have more value and can “protect” from competition etc. However if we would study this closer, the real reason could be that; 1. IPR simply is not shared because many do not see additional value in doing so 2. don’t know that they could share or don’t know how to share 3. simply don’t care for other uses beyond own use
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From Technology Transfer To Open IPR In addition to not have tools ar models available, leaving no incentives for doing extra effort to share. At the same time many would not mind, if their IPR’s would also be shared to others, specially if there would be some incentives like recognition, revenue share, etc. for doing so. So the solution would simply be to make it as easy and frictionless as possible to release and share to proper channels as well as to maybe give additional motivation by some benefit if the shared IPR create some real value in one form or another. What should the public sector do? Similar than in “Open Data”, also in the publicly funded research, IPR’s should be just openly shared as “Open IPR”. As in the new more open, networked and collaborative world and also considering the economic downturn, ­ it’s not for the public interest at large to allow for “closed” or “locked” publicly funded IPR’s to limit the access to publicly funded IPR’s. Or to make it difficult and unscalable process or expensive/upfront investment based to access, since that in fact lowers significantly the innovation potential that the IPR’s may hold. In addition public sector should act as a leader in this direction to motivate also more private sector and third sector organizations for opening up their unused IPR’s as well. Also as the very source of many new innovations are “connecting no­obvious dots’” ie. to connect seemingly unrelated ideas, resources, etc. and already also seen in Open Data and API’s, ­ in Open IPR, external companies, people, entrepreneurs etc. may find interesting ways to mix the created research IPR from multiple sources to create something totally different that what would be otherwise possible or even imaginable from the single IPR or research track alone. Allowing the innovators to mix various Open IPR’s the same way as a chef would do in
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