Meanwhile uganda continues to putter alongin the

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Meanwhile, Uganda continues to putteralongin the slowlane. 7Elections in UgandaNo jam todayKAMPALAThe presidentofUganda looks likelytohold on foranothertermMr Besigye, still in the back seathave spent more time in the library study-ing South African history. Among theworks they turned to ashes was a 1993 oilpainting by a black anti-apartheid artist,Keresemose Richard Baholo. It was called“Extinguished Torch of Academic Free-dom”, one ofa seriesofpaintingsdepictingprotestsatthe university.Students defaced a statue of Smuts anda bust of Maria Fuller, one of the first fourwomen to attend the university. She en-rolled in 1886, when most courses wereopen only to men. She went on to play arole in opening a women’s hall of resi-dence. She was, however, white. The protests are symptomatic of a re-surgence ofracial antagonism in South Af-rica, fanned by frustration over a slowingeconomy and high unemployment. Morethan two decades after apartheid endedblack South Africans are still worse offthan whites. Mostly, this is because theyare less well educated, a result of apart-heid’s legacy and the government’s failureto fix it. Bad education is a problem thatstartslongbefore studentsreach college. Among the protesters’ complaints atUCTwasthe implausible claim thatwhiteswere given preferential access to universi-ty accommodation. The protesters erecteda corrugated tin shack on UCT’s statelygroundsasa symbol ofhowrough life isinblack townships. They added a portableloo and overturned milkcratesaschairs.Some started a shisa nyama, grillingsausages and chops over charcoal. Theflames spread. The small band of studentsrefused to remove the shack, which univer-sity officials said was blocking traffic, andwent on a rampage. They burned a car, abus and the office ofMax Price, the univer-sity’s vice-chancellor. “It is utterly regretta-ble that a movement that began with suchpromise and purport to be fighting for so-cial justice matters has now deterioratedinto a group that engages in criminality,”MrPrice said.Little seems left of the lofty aims thatprompted studentsto take to the streets lastOctober, when they garnered widespreadsupport for their argument that high tu-ition fees put a university education out ofreach for black students from poor fam-ilies. The shortage of housing atUCTispartly due to the success of those protests:enrolment has increased thanks to lowerfees and measures to reduce student debt.Also, some university rooms are still occu-pied by students whose exams were de-layed bylastyear’sprotests.Students arrested for damaging proper-ty atUCTincluded several who are not ob-viously poor, such as the son of the chiefexecutive ofEskom, the state power utility.

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