Work with a partner you have a bag of red blue green

Info icon This preview shows pages 15–18. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Work with a partner. You have a bag of Red Blue Green Yellow 24 12 15 9 colored chips. You randomly select a chip from the bag and replace it. The table shows the number of times you select each color. a. There are 20 chips in the bag. Can you use the table to find the exact number of each color in the bag? Explain. b. You randomly select a chip from the bag and replace it. You do this 50 times, then 100 times, and you calculate the relative frequencies after each experiment. Which experiment do you think gives a better approximation of the exact number of each color in the bag? Explain. ACTIVITY: Finding Relative Frequencies 1 ACTIVITY: Using Relative Frequencies 2 When you conduct an experiment, the relative frequency of an event is the fraction or percent of the time that the event occurs. relative frequency = number of times the event occurs ————— total number of times you conduct the experiment Probability and Statistics In this lesson, you will find relative frequencies. use experimental probabilities to make predictions. use theoretical probabilities to find quantities. compare experimental and theoretical probabilities.
Image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Section 10.3 Experimental and Theoretical Probability 413 Work with a partner. You toss a thumbtack onto a table. There are two ways the thumbtack can land. a. Your friend says that because there are two outcomes, the probability of the thumbtack landing point up must be 1 2 . Do you think this conclusion is true? Explain. b. Toss a thumbtack onto a table 50 times and record your results. In a uniform probability model , each outcome is equally likely to occur. Do you think this experiment represents a uniform probability model? Explain. Use the relative frequencies to complete the following. P (point up) = P (on its side) = ACTIVITY: Conducting an Experiment 3 Use what you learned about relative frequencies to complete Exercises 6 and 7 on page 417. Point up On its side 4. IN YOUR OWN WORDS How can you use relative frequencies to find probabilities? Give an example. 5. Your friend rolls a number cube 500 times. How many times do you think your friend will roll an odd number? Explain your reasoning. 6. In Activity 2, your friend says, “There are no orange-colored chips in the bag.” Do you think this conclusion is true? Explain. 7. Give an example of an experiment that represents a uniform probability model. 8. Tell whether you can use each spinner to represent a uniform probability model. Explain your reasoning. a. b. c. Analyze Relationships How can you use the results of your experiment to determine whether this is a uniform probability model? Math Practice
Image of page 16
414 Chapter 10 Probability and Statistics Lesson 10.3 Lesson Tutorials Experimental Probability Probability that is based on repeated trials of an experiment is called experimental probability .
Image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 18
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern