With the fields in the South becoming less fertile from constant farming and

With the fields in the south becoming less fertile

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agriculture continued to blossom. With the fields in the South becoming less fertile from constant farming and the rocky soil and harsher climate of New England fueled this expansion. Once established, farmers could tailor what they grew to meet local and broader market needs. As cities and towns continued to grow demand for food products increased. The growing of wheat for flour, corn for human consumption and livestock feed and cotton are a few of the staples produced. Innovation had a large impact on agriculture like the cotton gin and the textile mills which turned the cotton into thread and cloth. The cotton gin made it easier to separate the cotton seeds from fibers which reduced time to market. The textile mills in the North were able to process the cotton quickly and as they become more efficient and reduced costs cotton cloth was the preferred cloth being bought by people in the cities and the plantation owners for clothing slaves. The mills need for more cotton and the cotton gin making it easier to get to market created a need for more land being allocated to grow it which increased the number of slaves needed to farm it in the South. The fact that a large percentage of the Souths population was slaves who had no consumer power meant the prospect manufacturing in the South was less lucrative than in the North. American cotton was also preferred by British textile manufactures which helped make it the primary cash crop during this time period (Meyer, 2003). Other
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