Acanthiza pusilla archibaldi is a small bird 9 to 115

Info icon This preview shows pages 153–155. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Acanthiza pusilla archibaldi is a small bird, 9 to 11.5 cm long and weighing about 7 grams, with a russet-brown forehead with indistinct pale scalloping, red eyes, olive-brown upperparts, a grey-brown tail with a dark band near the end, and off-white underparts with bold blackish streaks on the chin, throat and breast (Plate 9). Sexes appear the same, but males are possibly larger than females (Bryant & Jackson 1999). Brown Thornbills on mainland Tasmania usually occur singly, in twos or in small family groups, and this is also likely to be true of the King Island subspecies. Very little is known about Acanthiza pusilla archibaldi . The Tasmanian mainland subspecies feeds mainly on small insects in the canopy foliage, and this is also likely to be the case for the King Island subspecies. A domed nest consisting of shredded bark, grass and moss is built usually near the ground and clutch size is usually 3–4 eggs, which are white with fine reddish-brown spots. The breeding season is thought to run from September to December (Bryant & Jackson 1999). Current Status Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 : Endangered Tasmanian Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 : endangered Plate 9. Acanthiza pusilla Figure 8. Acanthiza pusilla archibaldi: King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 147
Image of page 153

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
(Copyright: The Nature of Tasmania) King Island distribution Existing Conservation Measures There are no existing conservation measures specifically for Acanthiza pusilla archibaldi. Distribution and Habitat Acanthiza pusilla archibaldi is endemic to King Island. The only confirmed records of this subspecies are of four birds collected in 1902, one bird collected in Pegarah State Forest in 1968, two birds mist-netted at Loorana in 1971, and two birds seen in Pegarah State Forest in 2002 (Figure 8). The subspecies has not been recorded since 2002 despite several surveys. Acanthiza pusilla archibaldi is thought to occur in eucalypt forest, woodland and tea tree thickets (Bryant & Jackson 1999). Acanthiza pusilla archibaldi may occur in the same habitats as those inhabited by the Critically Endangered King Island Scrubtit ( Acanthornis magna greeniana ) (Garnett & Crowley 2000). Populations Acanthiza pusilla archibaldi is thought to have once been widespread across King Island, although it appears never to have been common (Garnett & Crowley 2000). The subspecies in now thought to be restricted to a few remaining habitat remnants. The number of mature individuals has been estimated to be fewer than 50 breeding birds (Table 8; Garnett et al. 2011). All known subpopulations on King Island , and any new subpopulations found, are considered important for the survival of the species. Habitat critical to the survival of the species Habitat which is critical to the survival of Acanthiza pusilla archibaldi on King Island includes all remaining patches of potential habitat, including wet forest and wet scrub.
Image of page 154
Image of page 155
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern