Many slaves actively helped to put down the rebellion

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Many slaves actively helped to put down the rebellion because some of them had relatives and friends that were targeted victims. Slaves also feared the punishment of the whites and began to hear recounts of whites killing innocent blacks in nearby towns due to fear of potential revolt. For these reasons many slaves sought to put down Turner’s revolt. 4) What role did religion play in the life of Harriet Beecher Stowe? How did her religious views change during her lifetime? 5) As much as anyone of his era, John Brown was strongly influenced by what he saw happening around him. Identify the major turning point in his life and why you think it was significant. John Brown was in the beginning a very peaceful man who sought passively to rid the evils of slavery. He worked on the Underground railroad and publicly opposed the “black laws.” However, whenever President Franklin Pierce declared that the citizens of each territory would vote on whether or not to have slavery. Many Missourians began to invade Kansas, voted illegally, and vowed to exterminate every abolitionist in the territory. Violence broke out several as Missourians crossed the boarder to kill free state men and terrorize free-state settlements, which resulted in the Kansas civil war.The Kansas civil war was the major turning point in Brown’s life. It was during this period that Brown witnessed the destruction of his Osawatomie, and his son Frederick was killed. It was this result that led Brown to believe God was calling him to a special destiny and had chosen this terrible conflict, including the death of his own son, to show Brown what must be done to avenge the crimes of this “slave cursed” land. He vowed that he and his remaining sons would never stop fighting the evil forces of slavery until the war was won. Brown then sought to raise an army and gather financial support for his conquest.
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  • Spring '11
  • ?
  • History, Andrew Jackson, Separation of Powers, Supreme Court of the United States, President of the United States

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