The 1920 election resulted in a Republican landslide HardingCoolidge received

The 1920 election resulted in a republican landslide

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The 1920 election resulted in a Republican landslide. Harding/Coolidge received 16,152,200 popular votes and 404 electoral votes compared with Cox/Roosevelt totals of 9,147,353 popular votes and 127 electoral votes. Most memorable about the election of 1920 is that for the first time women had the right to vote. Though the Twenties was a decade of enormous social change, myths about the era sometimes exaggerate the reality of that strange and often troubling time. While consumerism boomed and many new inventions—radios and telephones, for example—became everyday items for many Americans, it was also a time of much bitterness, conflict, and disappointment. The economic boom left many in the dust, America’s traditional openness to immigration was severely cut back, and racial tensions rose. Prohibition, the “noble experiment,” caused ordinary citizens to resort to criminal behavior, even as government often winked and looked the other way.Following the Great War, as the only major Western nation not devastated by that conflict, Americans felt pretty good about themselves. The continued economic growth, political conservatism, and general absence of concerns over foreign affairs led Americans to think of themselves as “having it made.” Proof of America’s spirit and achievements seemed to be personified by Charles Lindbergh as he made his historic flight from New York to Paris in 1927. But the 1920s also saw deep divisions in the country despite the “roaring” atmosphere brought about by bathtub gin, speakeasies, flappers, women voting, jazz, sports, and all the rest. Then at the end of that self-satisfied, raucous, and somewhat grumpy decade, when the expectations of many Americans knew no bounds, the stock market crashed and the Great Depression hit. During the 1920s everybody seemed to be buying everything, and businesses set out to meet the demands of consumers, producing new products in record-breaking quantities. Cars, radios, appliances, ready-made clothes, gadgets, and other consumer products found their way into more and more American homes and garages. Americans also started buying stocks in greater numbers, providing capital to already booming companies.All the signs pointed upward, and starry-eyed men and women began to believe that it was going to be a one-way trip, possibly forever. Henry Ford’s assembly line not only revolutionized production, it democratized the ownership ofthe automobile. Ford showed that handsome profits could be made on small margin and high volume. By 1925 his famous Model T sold for less than $300, a modest price by the standards of the 1920s. Americans had never had it so good. (Many, of course, would not have it so good again for a long timeThe Twenties were also known as a time of revolution in manners and morals, when young men, and especially young women, threw off many of the social restrictions of the Victorian era and began conducting themselves in ways that scandalized the older generations. Young women liberated themselves in everything from
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