Language and Discrimination was also a fear in seeking medical treatment A high

Language and discrimination was also a fear in

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Language and Discrimination was also a fear in seeking medical treatment. A high percent of Hispanics do not speak English which made it difficult to communicate. Even when Hispanic Interpreters were used patient information was not relayed correctly causing a patient with depression not to be treated thinking symptoms were controlled. It was interesting to read that a reception ist made patients feel awkward, not wanted and a burden. A receptionist is the first employee a patient sees and should be a friendly experience. The Hispanics have adopted ways to cope which is to downplay their health concerns to eliminate the fear of embarrassment. The last fear is they feel they are unable to express the personal use of " traditional" remedies to treat diabetes. This is a conflict as medical professional use prescription medication to treat diabetes.
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I strongly agree that structural violence perpetuates health disparity. This journal reading was interesting to read and opened my eyes to cultures that I don’t have a lot of contact with. I believe health disparities are in every culture in every state. My personal experience with health insurance and physician appointments is somewhat relateable to the particip ants in this study. I limit my visits to yearly exams due to the cost of medical bills. The cost of medical treatment is rising and making difficult for all in come levels to afford. Hi Melana, You point out some key ideas in the article that add to the idea of structural violence and fear of many seeking health care. The Hispanic community in general faces discrimination on a daily basis and now with the current government situation here in the states, they are labeled with horrible portrayals. If I was in their shoes, I too would be fearful of seeking any type of help. The structural violence that takes place here in the United States is detrimental to those who are of lower socioeconomic status. One of the article statements you pointed out that I feel is key to this structural violence and fear is health care costs. Those who are making minimum wages and trying to support their household, don’t have the money to pay the medical bills that begin to pile up after just one visit. Even with a minimal health insurance policy people still have to pay out of pocket. That being said, the question they ask themselves is, do I need to pay my electricity bill or do I take my child to the doctor to face discrimination and possibly poor treatment? If I was in their situation, I would pay my electricity bill and pray for the best. I feel horrible that this is the way our country is and how people are still racist and discriminatory toward others. You would think that when seeking health care, you would find friendly, compassionate, and helpful individuals, but all too often, you find hurried, rushed, annoyed, and uncaring people who just seem to hate their job. The health care industry needs to create the atmosphere we are all taught in nursing school, where people want to help and are empathetic toward EVERYONE, no matter their socioeconomic level or immigration status. I am hoping that more facilities like the one in Albuquerque, begin to pop up in more lower income neighborhoods to help facilitate this change. It may take money from the government, but any move in the right direction is necessary.
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