We examine the share of publications in top journals in raceethnicity oriented

We examine the share of publications in top journals

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2016). We examine the share of publications in top journals, in race/ethnicity-oriented journals, and in all other journals for both disciplines (see Table 3). Sociology. We find that only about 13% of all URM sociologists in this study published in top journals (defined as the American Sociological Review, American Journal of
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230 The Review of Black Political Economy 45(3) Sociology , and Social Forces ) overall, with Latinos the most likely to do so (27%). Perhaps this explains why Latinos are most likely to have gained tenure and promotion to associate professor. Black men are the least likely to publish in these journals, although they are almost as likely as Latinos to hold the rank of full professors, sug- gesting that there is not a clear relationship between these two measures. Black women are also relatively unlikely (10%) to publish in top journals, but in their case, they are the most likely to be in the lowest rank of assistant professor. Black men and Latinas are the most likely to publish in race/ethnicity journals (52% and 51%, respectively). We do not know if publishing articles in a race/ethnicity journal were choices rather than rejections from the top journals as we do not, yet, have an archive of submitted manuscripts. 5 Between 80% and 90% of each group published at least one article in another peer-reviewed journal, with Latinos most likely to do so, followed by Black men. These results suggest that most URM scholars need to adhere to the “publish or perish” maxim at least at research extensive institutions. Economics. A high percentage of economists in this study publish in the top journals (defined as the American Economic Review, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Journal of Political Economy, JEL , and Review of Economics and Statistics ). As we include papers in five journals, this is one of the reasons why the counts in economics are higher than in sociology, along with the Papers and Proceedings issues of the Ameri- can Economic Review being included. Fewer URM economists publish in race/ethnic- ity journals. This may be the case because there are fewer race/ethnicity journals in which to publish that are recognized as “high quality” outlets by many economics departments. It might also be the case that fewer economists work on issue of race/ ethnicity and gender stratification. However, there are substantial differences among the intersectional groups. Of all, Latinas are the most likely to publish in top journals (43% compared with 35% of Black women and about 28% of Black men and Latinos). Black women are more likely to publish in race/ethnicity journals (27% compared with 14% of Black men and 4% of the other two groups). The range of groups publish- ing in another peer-reviewed journal was between 43% (Latinas and Black men) and Table 3. Intersectionality of URM Faculty by Publications in Percentages.
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