Procedures Data collection was conducted as part of the LSUHSC KIDS project a

Procedures data collection was conducted as part of

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Procedures Data collection was conducted as part of the LSUHSC-KIDS project, a large-scale school-initiated screening and interven- tion project with children and adolescents following Hurricane Katrina and the Gulf Oil Spill (Hansel et al. 2015 ). In the KIDS project, LSUHSC partners with schools in parishes impacted by disasters to screen student populations for disaster exposure and mental and behavioral health. Partnerships with schools are formed through long-term com- munity outreach and collaboration in the parishes. Outreach and collaboration are facilitated through Community Advisory Boards composed of school administration, staff, parents, community members, and students. The Community Advisory Boards help to identify schools that would benefit from and are interested in collaboration. This approach is in line with Participatory Action Research (PAR) principals, not only allowing for a more shared screening pro- cess, but can help to empower those involved (Gershon et al. 2008 ; McIntyre 2000 ). All students at partnering schools are invited to participate in screenings. Parents and guardians of children provide an- nual consent for screening, and students are given the oppor- tunity to refuse participation on all or parts of the screening at their discretion. The information collected from the screenings is used to inform school administration, teachers, and coun- selors about the needs of their students in an effort to enhance the school environment. The screening is also used as a refer- ral tool for school-based mental and behavioral health ser- vices. Reports, including compilations of students responses, are given to the schools in order to provide more information about students concerns in an effort to improve services and enhance the school environment. Therefore, the screenings are administered confidentially, but not anonymously, in order to enable further evaluation for students with elevated mental health symptoms or for those who requested services. In the current study, children under 8 years old were excluded from analyses. Younger children complete the screening via parent versus self-report, and therefore do not provide their own per- ceptions of their experiences. Screening packets, which in- cluded the questionnaires and measures described, were ad- ministered to children in the classroom with the teacher and an LSUHSC clinician present. This study was submitted and re- ceived approval by the IRB at LSUHSC. Data Analysis Analysis of qualitative data followed the guidelines as de- scribed by Creswell ( 2013 ) for validating the accuracy of in- formation in qualitative research design, wherein data are reviewed repeatedly, continually coded, and categorized into themes (see p. 197). Prior psychological research and theory on trauma in youth, as well as the unique responses of youth in the current study, guided this process. First, through careful review of the data and prior findings, we developed a qualita- tive codebook (Guest et al. 2012 ) containing a list of coding

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