it prohibited sex discrimination in federally aided education programs 4 What

It prohibited sex discrimination in federally aided

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it prohibited sex discrimination in federally aided education programs. 4. What was the purpose of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA)? A failed constitutional amendment introduced by the National Women's Party in 1923, declaring that “equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State on account of sex 5. Why did the ERA fail to be ratified by the States? Its proponents mounted a national campaign to generate approval (which they exaggerated , while its opponents caught wind of that and organized state-based anti-ERA campaigns. Supplemental Resource: 5 Major Ideas of the 14th Amendment video For a closer look at the 14th amendment watch “ 5 Major Ideas of the 14th Amendment .” This video was created by one of the course mentors. The transcript for this video can be accessed here: 5 Major Ideas of the 14th Amendment Transcript . For additional practice, you can also complete the 5 Major Ideas of the 14th Amendment Knowledge Check to assess your learning. Page 48 of 50
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Study Guide Survey of United States Government and Constitution For additional information, please attend one of our live cohort sessions. If you feel you still need and would like further assistance, please contact the course mentor. Page 49 of 50
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Study Guide Survey of United States Government and Constitution Appendix A, Study Guide, Chapter 3 Roadmap Image Alternate or Long Description ( from page 8) This image illustrates a concept map using one of the end of chapter summaries of your learning resource. It is color-coded and laid out with individual shapes enclosing text and arrows, to emphasize that sections or terms of the summaries can be used by you as a study tool. You can break down the summaries, identify terms, words, and themes, and use these to help you see connecting concepts. The larger paragraph is entitled “3.3 From Revolution to Confederation”, and is followed by the paragraph “After independence, a government was needed to replace the British monarchy. The Americans chose a republic, and defined the structure of that republic in the Articles of Confederation. Although the Articles guaranteed the states the independence they coveted, they were a failure; they left the central government too weak to deal with disorder and insurrection.” The first point of emphasis is about independence. Independence of the states also created a weak central government with very little power to engage in setting policies and enforcing them, such as no power to tax. The second point highlights the word “republic” in the paragraph. It defines it as “a government rooted in the consent of the governed, whose power is exercised by elected representatives responsible to the governed”. The third highlighted area leads from the highlighted term “Articles of Confederation” to emphasize state sovereignty, “In a confederation, the states retain their sovereignty, which means that each has supreme power within its border”.
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