This sort of americanization conflicts with democracy

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This sort of “Americanization” conflicts with democracy, for democracy is supposed to support the freedom of ideas and culture. Therefore, American interests in France during the 1960’s represent a type of imperialism that exploited French resources during their time of reconstruction. According to Servan- Schreiber, globalization was actually an “Americanization” of industry and technology, for American monopolistic expansion inhibited technological creativity and democracy.
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Moreover, Charles de Gaulle, the President of France during the 1960’s, declared that “Americanization” infiltrated French culture and society Novikov and Servan-Schreiber present social, economic, and political views on globalization during the Cold War era in which they regard American foreign policy as imperialistic. Clearly, globalization could not present an opportunity for democracy if American foreign policy during the Cold War was acting in imperialist ways and hindering the spread of democracy, but would this version of globalization change with the dissipation of the Cold War? According to Benjamin Barber and Samuel Huntington, old ideological conflicts have declined while globalization has increased. Barber explicitly states, “neither Jihad nor McWorld offers much hope to citizens looking for practical ways to govern themselves democratically” (Barber, 1). He uses the term “McWorld” to describe the globalization of politics in the new world (post Cold War) and breaks them down into four imperatives: market, resource, information-technology, and ecological. These imperatives have in combination achieved a considerable victory over factiousness and not least of all over the most virulent tradition form—nationalism. All in all, Barber views globalization as an integration and uniformity of economic and ecological forces, all of which challenge democracy. Samuel Huntington discusses globalization from a cultural perspective, proposing that the great divisions among humankind and the dominating source of conflict in the new world will be cultural. He hypothesizes, “Nation states will remain the most powerful actors in world affairs, but the principal conflicts of global politics will occur between nations and groups of different civilizations. The clash of civilizations will
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dominate global politics” (Huntington, 22). According to Huntington, Western civilizations will remain at distance from non-Western civilizations due to differences in values and morals; this schism reveals how globalization and democracy do not mix. In summation, all four of the authors regard globalization as an only an obstacle to democracy and in no instance view globalization as “an opportunity for the historic project of democracy.” Servan-Schreiber and Novikov define globalization as an American imperialist act, while Barber and Huntington offer modern descriptions of globalization. This evolution of the term “globalization” from the Cold War to present day has nonetheless been consistent in suggesting that globalization threatens democracy.
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