Sovereign in their internal affairs he thus argued

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sovereign in their internal affairs He thus argued that taxes laid upon the colonies by Parliament for the purpose of raising revenue, rather than regulating trade, were unconstitutional “If at length it becomes undoubted that an inveterate resolution is formed to annihilate the liberties of the governed, the English history affords frequent examples of resistance by force. What particular circumstances will in any future case justify such resistance can never be ascertained till they happen. Perhaps it may be allowable to say generally, that it never can be justifiable until the people are fully convinced that any further submission will be destructive to their happiness.” “It is, moreover, their humble opinion, which they express with the greatest deference to the wisdom of the Parliament, that the Acts made there, imposing duties on the people of this province, with the sole and express purpose of raising a revenue, are infringements of their natural and constitutional rights; because, as they are not represented in the British Parliament, his Majesty's commons in Britain, by those Acts, grant their property without their consent.” - Massachusetts Circular Letter to the Colonial Legislatures, February 11, 1768
Completely Useless Information The white part of your fingernail is Cats sleep between 14 and 16 hours a day. Right-handed people live, on average, nine years longer than left-
Discontent Explodes Boston Massacre (1770) British troops patrolled Boston like an occupied city due to Sons of Liberty campaign of ‘tarring and feathering’ tax collectors, looting official’s houses, and smuggling Poorly-paid British soldiers competed with colonists for jobs, which further increased tension Sons of Liberty began hurling rocks and snowballs at a British patrol Redcoats shot into crowd killing five people, including Crispus Attucks, a runaway mulatto slave, was the first casualty of the American Revolution Redcoats put on trial with colonial jury, but John Adams as “The Bloody Massacre” by Paul Revere Played a major role in turning the victims into martyrs by portraying the British as the aggressors and the colonists as peaceful protestors.
The Crisis Worsens (1772-1773) Gaspee Affair (1772) A British ship, Gaspee, that had been involved in policing colonial smuggling ran aground off coast New Haven, Connecticut Sons of Liberty looted the ship and burned it British plans to try attackers for treason in London increased tension between the two sides Committees of Correspondence (1772-73) Issued statements of rights and grievances Formed to help spread news of Gaspee Affair To warn neighboring colonies about incidents with Britain All colonies established Committees of Correspondence Tea Act (1773) Parliament passed the Tea Act to save the British East India Tea Company →Allowed company to sell
The Boston Tea Party (1773) Boston Tea Party (December 16, 1773) Sons of Liberty, instigated by Sam Adams and John Hancock, disguised as Mohawk

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