Stalls power off prop feathered on coming stall

Info icon This preview shows pages 21–25. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Stalls, Power Off, Prop Feathered : On coming stall warning is buffeting as with power on, however, the aircraft will not roll on a wing and can be held level with aileron and rudder control. The aircraft will sink vertically at a rate of 700 fpm. Stall recovery in this mode is to relax back pressure on the stick. 3.3 Spin Recovery : Reduce power and push control stick full forward. Apply fu11 rudder opposite to spin rotation. Recover smoothly from the dive. CAUTION The aerodynamic clean form or the DIMONA permits speed to build up rapidly. Vne must not be exceeded. Immediate spin recovery will result in an altitude loss of 280 ft. C A U T I 0 N if, under unfavorable circumstances with engine idle a flat spin will result, recover immediately as above but add power. 3—2
Image of page 21

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
20 Hoffmann 3 H 36 DIMONA Emergency Procedures 3.4 Engine Failure during Take-Off : Check immediately Fuel valve - ON position Fuel pump - ON position If these are not the cause of engine failure, and the altitude is less than 300ft, land straight ahead. If more than 300 ft altitude are available, a 180* turn in the glider mode can be made. The propeller should be feathered to reduce drag. 3 - 3
Image of page 22
21 Hoffmann 3 H 36 DIMONA Emergency Procedures 3.5. Engine Failure during flight : Check immediately : Fuel Valve - ON position Fuel pump - switch ON If the engine does not start or run, feather prop and establish a glide. Best glide ratio will be accomplished at an airspeed of 105 km/h (57 kts). 3.6 Emergency Landing : Choose a suitable field while altitude is available. Once you have made your decision, stick to it! Observe wind direction and on final approach position the aircraft to land into the wind. Attempt to land to a point with minimum ground roll. Prior to touchdown, all switches - OFF. Should engine power still be available, the selected landing site should be surveyed while airborne to see if obstacles exist. After landing - Throttle - Closed, all switches - OFF. 3.7 Icing Attempt to leave the icing area as soon as possible. If necessary, change altitude to escape icing layer. Continue to move controls to prohibit lockage from ice. When the canopy is iced over, the weather window may be opened. 3.8 Carburetor Icing Throttle - FULL POWER. Attempt to leave icing area as soon as possible, if necessary, change altitude. 3.9 Water Landing: Stop engine and feather propeller. On final approach jettison canopy. Land with minimum airspeed. On touchdown protect your face with the left arm. After touchdown release seat harness and exit aircraft. 3-4
Image of page 23

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
22 Hoffmann 3 H 36 DIMONA Emergency Procedures 3.10 Engine fire during flight : Throttle - full power Fuel Valve - OFF Cabin Heat - Push , Cabin air - Pull Ignition - OFF when engine Stops Slipping the aircraft can keep smoke and flames from the cockpit Execute normal landing from a glide 3. 11 Electrical Fire during flight : Main Switch - OFF Circuit breakers - PULL OFF The engine will continue to run. Land as soon as practical or at the next airfield 3.12 Canopy Jettison - Aircraft exiting during flight : With engine running - Throttle CLOSED Ignition OFF With engine stopped - Prop feathered -
Image of page 24
Image of page 25
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern