160 A key point of contention in the case was the unmatched left leg found

160 a key point of contention in the case was the

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[160] A key point of contention in the case was the unmatched left leg found after the bombing. Although it was initially believed to be from a male, it was later determined to be that of Lakesha Levy, a female member of the Air Force who was killed in the bombing. [163] Levy's coffin had to be re-opened so that her leg could replace another unmatched leg that had previously been buried with her remains. The unmatched leg had been embalmed, which prevented authorities from being able to extract DNA to determine the leg's owner. [92] Jones argued that the leg could have belonged to another bomber, possibly John Doe #2. [92] The prosecution disputed the claim, saying that the leg could have belonged to any one of eight victims who had been buried without a left leg. [164] Numerous damaging leaks, which appeared to originate from conversations between McVeigh and his defense attorneys, emerged. They included a confession said to have been inadvertently included on a computer disk that was given to the press, which McVeigh believed seriously compromised his chances of getting a fair trial. [160] A gag order was imposed during the trial,
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prohibiting attorneys on either side from commenting to the press on the evidence, proceedings, or opinions regarding the trial proceedings. The defense was allowed to enter into evidence six pages of a 517-page Justice Department report criticizing the FBI crime laboratory and David Williams, one of the agency's explosives experts, for reaching unscientific and biased conclusions. The report claimed that Williams had worked backward in the investigation rather than basing his determinations on forensic evidence. [165] The jury deliberated for 23 hours. On June 2, 1997, McVeigh was found guilty on eleven counts of murder and conspiracy. [166] [167] Although the defense argued for a reduced sentence of life imprisonment, McVeigh was sentenced to death. [168] In May 2001, the FBI announced that it had withheld over 3,000 documents from McVeigh's defense counsel. [169] The execution was postponed for one month for the defense to review the documents. On June 6, federal judge Richard Paul Matsch ruled the documents would not prove McVeigh innocent and ordered the execution to proceed. [170] After President George W. Bush approved the execution (McVeigh was a federal inmate and federal law dictates that the President must approve the execution of federal prisoners), he was executed by lethal injection at the Federal Correctional Complex, Terre Haute in Terre Haute , Indiana , on June 11. [171] [172] [173] The execution was transmitted on closed-circuit television so that the relatives of the victims could witness his death. [174] McVeigh's execution was the first federal execution in 38 years. [175] [ edit ] Terry Nichols Main article: Terry Nichols Nichols stood trial twice. He was first tried by the federal government in 1997 and found guilty of conspiring to build a weapon of mass destruction and of eight counts of involuntary manslaughter of federal officers. [176] After he was sentenced on June 4, 1998 to life without
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