IT 101 - Chapter 6 TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORKS

Chapter 6 telecommunications and networks 2 7 9

Info icon This preview shows pages 50–52. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 6 | Telecommunications and Networks | 2 7 9 analysis exercises b. Survey results suggest that the peak traffic to and from a site will be approximately 2 kilo- bits per second for each phone line plus 10 ki- lobits per second for each computer. Create a report showing the estimated peak demand for the telecommunications system at each site in kilobits. Create a second report grouped by region and showing regional subtotals and a total for the system as a whole. 3. Wireless Radiation Frying Your Brains? Radio waves, microwaves, and infrared all belong to the electromagnetic radiation spectrum. These terms reference ranges of radiation frequencies that we use every day in our wireless networking en- vironments. However, the very word “radiation” strikes fear in many people. Cell towers have sprouted from fields all along highways. Tall rooftops harbor many more cell stations in cities. Millions of cell phone users place microwave transmitters/receivers next to their heads each time they make a call. Wireless access points for computer networks have become ubiquitous. Even McDonalds’s customers can use their ma- chines to browse the Internet as they eat burgers. With all this radiation zapping about, should we be concerned? The electromagnetic spectrum ranges from ultra-low frequencies, radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible light, ultraviolet, X-ray, up to gamma-ray radiation. Is radiation dangerous? The threat appears to come from two different direc- tions, the frequency and the intensity. A prepon- derance of research has demonstrated the dangers of radiation at frequencies just higher than those of visible light. This even includes the ultraviolet light used in tanning beds, X-rays, and gamma rays. These frequencies are high enough (the wavelengths are small enough) to penetrate and disrupt molecules and even atoms. The results range from burns to damaged DNA that might lead to cancer or birth defects. However, radiation’s lower frequencies rang- ing from visible light (the rainbow colors you can see), infrared, microwave, and radio waves have long waves unable to penetrate molecules. Indeed, microwave wavelengths are so long that micro- wave ovens use a simple viewing screen that can block these long waves and yet allow visible light through. As a result, we can watch our popcorn pop without feeling any heat. Keep in mind that visible light consists of radiation frequencies closer to the “danger end” of the spectrum than micro- wave light. Site Location Region Phone Lines Computers Boston East 228 95 New York East 468 205 Richmond East 189 84 Atlanta East 192 88 Detroit East 243 97 Cincinnati East 156 62 New Orleans Central 217 58 Chicago Central 383 160 Saint Louis Central 212 91 Houston Central 238 88 Denver West 202 77 Los Angeles West 364 132 San Francisco West 222 101 Seattle West 144 54
Image of page 50

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lower radiation frequencies can cause damage only if the intensity is strong enough, and that dam- age is limited to common burns. Microwave ovens cook food by drawing 800 or more watts and con-
Image of page 51
Image of page 52
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern