Readily overpowered by negative intergroup

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readily overpowered by negative intergroup interactions. Thus the top priority for managers faced with intergroup conflict is to identify and root out specific negative linkages between or among groups. More specifically, focusing on the perceived security and quality of the interactions matters. If you and/or your managers can make the out-group feel there is nothing at stake (they are not being evaluated), they are more likely to feel secure and satisfied with the interaction. This reassurance can also reduce both groups’ prejudices about the other. We can achieve such benefits by sharing social interests or social events where the focus is not on work, particularly the out-group’s work ii. Conflict Reduction - Several actions are recommended: - Eliminate specific negative interactions (obvious enough). - Conduct team building to reduce intra-group conflict and prepare for cross-functional teamwork. - Encourage and facilitate friendships via social events (happy hours, sports leagues, and book clubs). - Foster positive attitudes (empathy and compassion). - Avoid or neutralize negative gossip. - Practice the above—be a role model iii. Creating a Psychologically Safe Climate - A psychological safety climate represents a shared belief among team members that it is safe to engage in risky behaviors, such as questioning current practices without retribution or negative consequences. When employees feel psychologically safe, they are more likely to speak up and present their ideas and less likely to take disagreements personally. This interaction results in increased team creativity, less conflict within and between teams, and higher individual and team performance. Psychological safety climates also help improve employee turnover, safe work behaviors, and job satisfaction - How can you and your employers create or foster a climate for psychological safety? Here are three fundamental and widely applicable practices: 1. Ensure leaders are inclusive and accessible. 2. Hire and develop employees who are comfortable expressing their own ideas, and receptive and constructive to those expressed by others. 6
Chapter 10 Notes Managing Conflict and Negotiations 3. Celebrate & reinforce the value of differences between group members and their ideas. 3. Forms of Conflict Intensified by Technology What can I do to manage work–family conflict and incivility to make me more effective at school, work, and home? a. Work - Family Conflict - Work–family conflict occurs when the demands or pressures from work and family domains are mutually incompatible. Work–family conflict can take two distinct forms: work interference with family and family interference with work Negative Consequences of Conflicts Between Work, Family, and Other Life Domains Work interference with family Family interferes Outcomes linked to life more generally Job satisfaction Martial satisfaction Life satisfaction Intentions to quit Family satisfaction Health problems Absenteeism Family - related strain Depression Performance Family related performance Substance use/abuse i. Balance is Key To Reducing Conflict - But more often than not you will have to balance demands coming from the different domains of your life. Here are some ideas to consider. - Work–family balance begins at home. Case studies of successful executives reveal that family and spousal support is critical for reaching senior-level positions. This suggests that both men and women need help with domestic responsibilities if there is any chance of achieving work–family balance. - An employer’s family-supportive philosophy is more important than specific programs. Organizational culture must support the use of family-friendly programs in order for employees to benefit from them. For instance, it’s not enough to simply provide child care; employees must also feel supported and comfortable using it. The same goes for leaving work early to attend a child’s sporting event or recital. - The importance of work–family balance varies across generations. A study of the work values of 16,000 adults of all ages suggests that organizations should consider implementing work policies targeted toward different generational groups. For example, flextime and compressed work programs can attract and retain both Gen Ys and Gen Xers, while job enrichment may be a more effective way to motivate boomers.

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