The dwarf planets are not massive enough to do this Ceres is found a region of

The dwarf planets are not massive enough to do this

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The dwarf planets are not massive enough to do this. Ceres is found a region of small rocky bodies between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter known as the Asteroid Belt. Pluto, Huamea, Makemake, and Eris are in a region of small icy bodies beyond Neptune known as the Kuiper Belt. Ceres, Another Former Planet Ceres was considered a planet for 50 years after its discovery in 1801
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Reclassified as an “asteroid” after similar bodies were found between Mars & Jupiter Now, also a dwarf planet On january 1 1801, Ceres was discovered (after Uranus, before Neptune and Pluto). It was celebrated as a “new planet” between Mars & Jupiter. Ceres was listed as a planet in astronomy books and tables for about half a century. Ceres turned out to be disappointingly small, only 1000 km across. When other, similar but smaller, objects were found in the same area between Mars and Jupiter, Ceres was demoted from planethood and re-designated an “Asteroid” (small rocky body orbiting the Sun), of which it is the largest of millions. Lesson 3 Lecture 14 1. Solar System orbits and rotates in an orderly pattern All the planets orbit the Sun in the same direction o Counterclockwise (from above north pole) o same plane! Most also rotate in this direction Most large moons orbit their planets in this direction 2. Two main types of planets- terrestrial and jovian 3. Asteroids and comets populate the Solar System they are a rich source of information about the origin of the planets. According to the solar nebular theory, our solar system formed from a giant cloud of interstellar gas and dust ( nebula = cloud) Astronomers have a theory for the origin of our solar system that is consistent both with observations of the solar system and with observations of star formation. The solar nebula theory supposes that: Stars form from cold, dense clouds of gas and dust in interstellar space that collapse under the influence of their own gravity. Planets form in the rotating disks of gas and dust around these forming stars. Forming inside the pillars are embryonic stars. Eventually, the stars themselves emerge from the pillars as they are eroded away by ultraviolet light from hot, massive, young stars. The beginning of the solar system As the solar nebula contracted, three things happened to it: Rotation rate increased Flattened into a disk Temperature increased -Protosun formed at the center Accreted gas from the disk
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The story of the formation of the solar system starts before the Sun formed. The material that now makes up the Sun was distributed thinly in interstellar space in the form of a large cloud of gas and dust. The Sun began to form a little more than 4.6 billion years ago when this cloud (or part of it) began a process of contraction and flattening. It doesn't take much to start this initial contraction. The cloud only needs to feel a random disturbance (or perturbation) from outside to start the process of gravitational collapse.
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