Proponents of a hard brexit recognize that although

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Proponents of a ‘Hard’ Brexit recognize that although the initial phases of Brexit could be burdensome, in the long term, Britain will redeem the losses by concluding its own free-trade deals, which will put Britain in a better situation in the long term. A ‘Soft’ Brexit means that Britain would remain both within the single market and in the customs union, meaning that the UK would remain bound by the EU’s customs and trade regulations. The goal of a ‘Soft’ Brexit is to minimize the cost to the UK and to lessen the disruption to trade and businesses that would be affected by departing from the EU’s regulations and rules. Prime Minister Theresa May’s position on the Brexit seems to be on the hard Brexit side, as she wants to take back the control of Britain’s laws, borders and fiscal policies. PM May set out the plan for Britain, including the 12 priorities that the UK government used to negotiate Brexit on January 17th 2017, at Lancaster House. May’s list of negotiating objectives emphasized that in respect to future relationship between the UK and the EU, the relationship will be based on ambitious free trade agreement rather than membership of the single market. (GOV.UK, 2017) Her policy objectives also stated the need to end the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice (ECJ), the desire to establish the full control of immigration, and the need to strengthen the union between the four nations of the UK. The formal negotiations for Brexit began in June 2017. The process of Brexit had a bitter start for Britain. Following May’s introducing of the Brexit draft to Parliament, two senior government ministers resigned in addition to already the two that resigned in the summer. In order for the UK to leave the EU, the UK had to invoke article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty. Article 50 allows member states to leave the EU unilaterally and allows the member country to negotiate an exit deal with the EU within two years unless the European Council and the leaving member state unanimously decides to extend this period. Prime Minister Theresa May triggered article 50 on March 29, 2017. The objective of the Brexit negotiations is to agree the terms of the UK’s exit from the EU. Negotiations have been taking place on an orderly basis, and the first phase of negotiations address three core pillars of withdrawal issues: 1- Guaranteeing citizen’s rights (EU citizens currently living in the UK and UK citizens currently living in the EU) 2- Settling the UK’s financial commitments 3- Republic of Ireland and Norther Ireland backstop issues On 14 November 2018, the UK and the European commission reached an agreement on the withdrawal agreement and on an outline of the political declaration on the future of the EU-UK relationship. 1. What is in the Withdrawal Agreement?

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