working on three academic projects scheduled for completion this year the

Working on three academic projects scheduled for

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working on three academic projects scheduled for completion this year– the renovation of Julian Street Library at Princeton University, the new Academic Resource Center at NYU, and the Franklin Field Student Study Lounge at the University of Pennsylvania.Dolores Hayden, professor, was on leave in Spring 2011. She gave the keynote for a March
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conference at Connecticut College, "Smart Growth: Social and Environmental Implications," and lectured at MIT in March on her book, Building Suburbia.Her articles are forthcoming in the Journal of Urban History and The Yale Review, and an exhibition review in the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians.She organized a panel on "Poets' Landscapes and Sense of Place," and she delivered a paper, "The poet, scale, and spatial imagination" at the June conference, "Exploring From and Narrative" at West Chester University. She has given readings from her newest collection of poems, Nymph, Dun, and Spinnerat several Connecticut public libraries and the Rutgers MFA conference. Laura P. Turlington (’89), lecturer, with her office, Pirie Turlington Architects in New Haven, CT, is pleased to highlight a restoration and addition project completed y the firm as featured in the book Tomorrow’s Houses – New England Modernism, co-authored by Alex Gorlin, text (Also YSOA affiliated) and Geoffrey Gross, photography, published by Rizzoli International, New York, 2011. The project involved a house designed by Tony Smith, one time Frank Lloyd Wright project architect and who was ultimately best known for his work as a sculptor, designed two houses for members of the Olsen family in the Old Quarry in Guilford, Connecticut. The restoration involved removing several unfortunate additions, dismantling the original building, salvaging what was useable, and rebuilding the house to Smith’s design. This included reinforcing and refurbishing Korean War era steel. True to its era, the house was meticulously designed on a 16 inch module, and the new design went to great lengths to maintain this throughout, including 16 inch floor and ceiling thicknesses and 10 foot-eight inch ceiling heights while integrating new HVAC systems and dramatically improving thermal performance to meet current requirements.
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