Your research group decides to begin by using a

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Your research group decides to begin by using a battery, a wire, and a light bulb to make the simplest possible model of a single electrical synapse. In this model, chemical reactions in the battery provide the difference in voltage across the synapse that causes ions to flow from one neuron to the next. The flow of ions across the synapse is manifested in the bulb as light and heat. You are interested in modeling the flow of energy and charge, and your first step is to determine the simplest possible conditions under which energy can be transferred using a single battery, a single wire, and a single bulb. To do this you determine all of the possible configurations to light a bulb with a single wire and a single battery. How many different configurations will cause the bulb to light? Read Sternheim & Kane Chapter 17 sections 1-6 and 12. E QUIPMENT You have a light bulb, battery and banana cable. If you need assistance, send an email to [email protected] . Include the room number and brief description of the problem. W ARM UP 1. Make a drawing of a single light bulb connected to the battery with a single wire so that the bulb will light. What parts of each object must be touching for the light bulb to light? Is this the only configuration possible? If not, make drawings of other possible configurations. 2. What object in the circuit is the source of energy? Using your drawing(s), describe how the energy gets to the light bulb. What happens to the energy after it gets to the light bulb? 39
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ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS – 1202Lab2Prob1 3. Along which path is the energy carried? Draw arrows to indicate the path of the energy carriers. Are the energy carriers conserved or do they just disappear at the light bulb? If they are conserved, where do they go after delivering energy to the light bulb? 4. What does the battery voltage have to do with this energy? How are the energy carriers related to the electric charge? 5. Using your drawing, describe how conservation of energy applies to the system defined as the light bulb while the bulb is lit. Identify the initial energy of the system, the final energy of the system, any energy entering the system, and any energy leaving the system. 6. Using your drawing, describe how conservation of charge applies to the system defined as the light bulb while the bulb is lit. Identify the initial charge of the system, the final charge of the system, any charge entering the system, and any charge leaving the system 7. Check the drawing(s) you made in question 1. Does it obey conservation of energy? Does it obey conservation of charge? If the answer to any of these questions is no, change your drawing so that the answers are yes. 8. Write down the general properties of an electric circuit that always obeys conservation of energy and conservation of charge and lights the bulb.
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