All of these steps and actions so far are prewriting

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Database Systems: Design, Implementation, & Management
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Chapter 2 / Exercise 10
Database Systems: Design, Implementation, & Management
Coronel/Morris
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All of these steps and actions so far are prewritingactions. Again, almost no one just sits down andstarts writing a paper at the beginningat least not a successful paper! These prewriting steps help youget going in the right direction. Once you are ready to start drafting your essay, keep moving forward inthese ways: Write a short statement of intent or outline your paper before your first draft. Such a road map can be very useful, but don’tassume you’llalways be able to stick with your first plan. Onceyou start writing, you may discover a need for changes in the substance or order of things in youressay. Such discoveries don’tmean you made “mistakes”in the outline. They simply mean you areinvolved in a process that cannot be completely scripted in advance.
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Database Systems: Design, Implementation, & Management
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Chapter 2 / Exercise 10
Database Systems: Design, Implementation, & Management
Coronel/Morris
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Saylor URL: Saylor.org 313 Write down on a card or a separate sheet of paper what you see as your papers mainpoint or thesis. As you draft your essay, look back at that thesis statement. Are you staying ontrack? Or are you discovering that you need to change your main point or thesis? From time to time,check the development of your ideas against what you started out saying you would do. Revise asneeded and move forward. Reverse outline your paper. Outlining is usually a beginning point, a road map for the task ahead. But many writers find that outlining what they have already written in a draft helps them see moreclearly how their ideas fit or do not fit together. Outlining in this way can reveal trouble spots that areharder to see in a full draft. Once you see those trouble spots, effective revision becomes possible. Don’t obsess over detail when writing the draft. Remember, you have time for revising and editing later on. Now is the time to test out the plan you’vemade and see how your ideas develop. Thelast things in the world you want to worry about now are the little things like grammar andpunctuationspend your time developing your material, knowing you can fix the details later. Read your draft aloud. Hearing your own writing often helps you see it more plainly. A gap or an inconsistency in an argument that you simply do not see in a silent reading becomes evident when yougive voice to the text. You may also catch sentence-level mistakes by reading your paper aloud. What’s the Difference between Revising and Editing?Some students think of a draft as something that they need only “correctafter writing. They assume theirfirst effort to do the assignment resulted in something that needs only surface attention. This is a bigmistake. A good writer does not write fast. Good writers know that the task is complicated enough todemand some patience. Revisionrather than “correction”suggests seeing again in a new lightgenerated by all the thought that went into the first draft. Revising a draft usually involves significantchanges including the following: Making organizational changes like the reordering of paragraphs (do

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